Best Places to Buy Gardening Seeds

Best Places to Buy Gardening Seeds. This is a list of options for the purchase of gardening seeds locally, as well as the online purchase of your vegetable seeds, flower seeds, and herb seeds.





Best Places to Buy Gardening Seeds

It is that time of year! Time to start growing your garden seedlings for spring planting. You may have already decided what you are going to plant, and now are wondering where to get your seeds. If you are wondering where to buy gardening seeds, I am here to help! Below are a number of options for the local purchase or online purchase of your vegetable seeds, flower seeds, and herb seeds. I did break down where you can get good organic seeds online.

First, an explanation of the types of seeds available for purchase:

Non-GMO Seeds: As far as I know, you are only able to purchase GMO seeds if you are a farmer. As a regular gardening consumer, you are buying non-GMO seeds online and at the local garden center (if you worry it is possible to have some contamination, or some money going to a GMO company some seeds are labeled non-GMO as an assurance).

For those that are looking for a definition of GMO seeds (because we have heard it a lot the last few years), it is: a genetically modified organism that is the result of a laboratory process where genes from the DNA of one species are extracted and artificially forced into the genes of an unrelated plant or animal. Here is more information about GMO if you are curious. And this Popular Science article tells you how to do it!

Hybrid seeds – a hybrid seed is a seed produced by cross-pollinating two (or more) plants. An F1 hybrid is a variety that has been produced by the carefully controlled cross breeding of two parent plants specially chosen for their different desirable qualities such as plant type, disease resistance, uniformity, crop yield, unique color and so on. Hybrid seeds can also be produced organically (by insect, bird, wind, humans).

Open-pollinated seeds – when pollination occurs by insect, bird or wind.

Heirloom seeds – is the plant heritage. They generally have been passed down from generation to generation (thought of as 50+ years old). An heirloom variety is open-pollinated, but not all open-pollinated plants are heirlooms varieties.

Organic seeds – organic seeds are harvested from plants grown without synthetic chemical fertilizers, pesticides or fungicides. They, therefore have no residues from those chemicals.

You will need to decide what type of seeds you want to plant. If you would like to convert to an organic garden, you would purchase organic seeds. Here are some tips for how to convert to an organic garden.

If you are planning a theme garden, such as a patio garden or perhaps a salsa garden, you have more options.

Many people are all about heirloom tomatoes, but I have to tell you, blight took such a toll on my heirloom tomatoes a few years ago that I had to switch to a hybrid tomato because the variety was heartier. Last year, we went with cherry tomatoes.

Just be aware that there are pros and cons to each type of seed. Heartiness, taste, ease of growth as well as your climate, all should factor into what type of plants and seeds you grow in your garden.

Where to buy gardening seeds locally:

Home Depot – make sure you sign up for the Home Depot Gardening Club for coupons and discounts.

Lowes Garden Center – sign up for the Lowes Garden Club

• Your local Garden Nursery!! You can also get expert advice from the Master Gardener on hand to help you determine what fruits, vegetables, and herbs will grow best in your climate and local soil (once transferred).

• Your local Gardening Co-op There are not too many nationally, but they are growing. (haha, get it? they are gro… er, nevermind)

• Ask at your local CSA! – there are specific seed and plant CSAs, as well as the everyday variety community supported agriculture farms that may/may not sell you seeds.

Where to buy gardening seeds online:

These are some of the foremost names in online gardening seeds. Many of these places online sell Non-Hybrid and Organic seeds- vegetable, herb and flower seeds.

Burpee – they definitely have a lot of product and have been around a long, long time.

R.H. Shumway – specializes in heirloom varieties of vegetable and flowers. Many of the farm seed were developed in the 1940s and 1950s.

Rare Seeds – they offer over 1850 fine varieties of seeds, some of which you have probably never heard of! They claim to be America’s top source for heirloom seeds.

Seed Savers – a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of heirloom vegetables, flowers and fruits. They sell Non GMO Vegetable Seeds, Heirloom Vegetable Seeds, Organic Vegetable Seeds.
Seed Savers Exchange is a tax-exempt 501(c)3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation of heirloom seeds.
They offer a membership, and membership benefits.

Johnny’s Seeds – one of the nine original signers of the Safe Seed Pledge.

This is the safe seed pledge:
Agriculture and seeds provide the basis upon which our lives depend. We must protect this foundation as a safe and genetically stable source for future generations. For the benefit of all farmers, gardeners, and consumers who want an alternative,

We pledge that we do not knowingly buy, sell, or trade genetically-engineered seeds or plants.

The mechanical transfer of genetic material outside of natural reproductive methods and between genera, families, or kingdoms, poses great biological risks as well as economic, political, and cultural threats. We feel that genetically engineered varieties have been insufficiently tested prior to public release. More research and testing are necessary to further assess the potential risks of genetically-engineered seeds. Further, we wish to support agricultural progress that leads to healthier soils, genetically diverse agricultural ecosystems, and ultimately healthy people and communities.

Johnny’s Seeds sellsCertified Organic Seeds, F1 Hybrid Seeds (seeds that are a cross, not an open pollinated strain), Open-Pollinated & Heirloom Seeds.

If you are looking for more seed catalog places to buy from (it is not a recommendation, it is merely a list), The Farmer’s Almanac has a pretty extensive list here.

Safe Planting Times in Your Area
How to Grow Garden Seeds

Where is your favorite place to purchase gardening seeds?


Disclosure: the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• For more Gardening posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• If you enjoyed this post, be sure to sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life weekly newsletter, and never miss another article!



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life

How to Make Easter Egg Planters

How to Make Easter Egg Planters. Are you looking for a cool succulent planters craft that can be made by adults and children alike? This easy egg planter idea is a fun Easter kids crafts (two variations), as well as a wonderful, simple to make adult Easter craft.  So use up those old plastic eggs and make some fun egg shaped planters!





How to Make Easter Egg Planters

Easter is an exciting time for bunnies, chicks, flowers, and of course, eggs! These adorable easter egg planters are so much fun to make, and they are also simple and an inexpensive decor option. You can use these planters to grow tiny succulent plants all spring long, set them up on your Easter brunch table as favors, or to complement a larger Easter centerpiece.

Use these egg shaped planters indoors or outdoors to add a bit of spring flair to your garden! These are a wonderful Easter kids craft for those of you looking for Easter crafts for kids!

If you like easy to make Easter crafts, you may also want to consider this No Sew Sock Bunny (simple, yet adorable!), this Easy DIY Bunny Butt Wreath, this Spring Themed DIY Framed Dot Art (great for before and after Easter!), or, if you have children, this Easter Bunny Garland!

How to Make Easter Egg Planters. Are you looking for a cool succulent planters craft that can be made by adults and children alike? This easy egg planter idea is a fun Easter kids crafts (two variations), as well as a wonderful, simple to make adult Easter craft.  So use up those old plastic eggs and make some fun egg shaped planters!


Easter Egg Planters Materials:

Plastic Jumbo Eggs
Small Paintbrush
Parchment Paper
Glue Gun
• Glue Sticks
Gold Acrylic Paint
Potting Soil
Mini Succulent Plants

How to Make Easter Egg Planters. Are you looking for a cool succulent planters craft that can be made by adults and children alike? This easy egg planter idea is a fun Easter kids crafts (two variations), as well as a wonderful, simple to make adult Easter craft.  So use up those old plastic eggs and make some fun egg shaped planters!


Easter Egg Planters Directions:

• Crack open your Easter eggs and separate the rounded bottom from the oblong top. You will just use the bottom for this project.
• Use a small paintbrush to paint the outside edge of each egg (where they connect with the other side of the Easter egg) with gold paint. You may need to apply 2 or 3 coats for the gold paint to be noticed. Allow to dry completely in between coats of gold paint.

How to Make Easter Egg Planters. Are you looking for a cool succulent planters craft that can be made by adults and children alike? This easy egg planter idea is a fun Easter kids crafts (two variations), as well as a wonderful, simple to make adult Easter craft.  So use up those old plastic eggs and make some fun egg shaped planters!


How to Make Easter Egg Planters. Are you looking for a cool succulent planters craft that can be made by adults and children alike? This easy egg planter idea is a fun Easter kids crafts (two variations), as well as a wonderful, simple to make adult Easter craft.  So use up those old plastic eggs and make some fun egg shaped planters!


• When the paint is dry, tear a small piece of parchment paper and set it on a table. Heat your glue gun.
• Squeeze some hot glue onto the parchment paper until your dot is about the same size as a quarter.
• Press an Easter egg into the glue while it is still wet. When the glue dries, peel it off the paper and it will stand on its own. Repeat for all eggs.

How to Make Easter Egg Planters. Are you looking for a cool succulent planters craft that can be made by adults and children alike? This easy egg planter idea is a fun Easter kids crafts (two variations), as well as a wonderful, simple to make adult Easter craft.  So use up those old plastic eggs and make some fun egg shaped planters!


• This is what it will look like when you are finished.

How to Make Easter Egg Planters. Are you looking for a cool succulent planters craft that can be made by adults and children alike? This easy egg planter idea is a fun Easter kids crafts (two variations), as well as a wonderful, simple to make adult Easter craft.  So use up those old plastic eggs and make some fun egg shaped planters!


How to Make Easter Egg Planters. Are you looking for a cool succulent planters craft that can be made by adults and children alike? This easy egg planter idea is a fun Easter kids crafts (two variations), as well as a wonderful, simple to make adult Easter craft.  So use up those old plastic eggs and make some fun egg shaped planters!


How to Make Easter Egg Planters. Are you looking for a cool succulent planters craft that can be made by adults and children alike? This easy egg planter idea is a fun Easter kids crafts (two variations), as well as a wonderful, simple to make adult Easter craft.  So use up those old plastic eggs and make some fun egg shaped planters!


• Fill the eggs with potting soil.

How to Make Easter Egg Planters. Are you looking for a cool succulent planters craft that can be made by adults and children alike? This easy egg planter idea is a fun Easter kids crafts (two variations), as well as a wonderful, simple to make adult Easter craft.  So use up those old plastic eggs and make some fun egg shaped planters!


• Place your succulents inside each egg. Add a little bit of water to keep your plants moist.

How to Make Easter Egg Planters. Are you looking for a cool succulent planters craft that can be made by adults and children alike? This easy egg planter idea is a fun Easter kids crafts (two variations), as well as a wonderful, simple to make adult Easter craft.  So use up those old plastic eggs and make some fun egg shaped planters!


• Place your Easter egg planters in a sunny location and you are good to go!

How to Make Easter Egg Planters. Are you looking for a cool succulent planters craft that can be made by adults and children alike? This easy egg planter idea is a fun Easter kids crafts (two variations), as well as a wonderful, simple to make adult Easter craft.  So use up those old plastic eggs and make some fun egg shaped planters!


How to Make Easter Egg Planters. Are you looking for a cool succulent planters craft that can be made by adults and children alike? This easy egg planter idea is a fun Easter kids crafts (two variations), as well as a wonderful, simple to make adult Easter craft.  So use up those old plastic eggs and make some fun egg shaped planters!


These really are a cute Easter craft, perfect for spring which is right around the corner! Use them as decor, as table favors, as Easter favors, or simply make them because they are adorable!

• To print the How to Make Easter Egg Planters Instructions, click here.


Disclosure: the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• For more Holiday posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• For more Craft posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• For more Gardening posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• If you enjoyed this post, be sure to sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life weekly newsletter, and never miss another article!



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life

Invasion of the Cucumbers

Invasion of the Cucumbers. It is time for a mid-summer gardening update!


It is time for a mid-summer gardening update!

As I mentioned previously, Hubby and I are looking for a new home. That means I wasn’t going to go bonkers with the gardens this year just in case we actually did find something, and had to move. I didn’t want to begin growing plants and then leave them to languish or die. That meant I was confining the 2016 gardening to containers and the perennials that were already in the ground.

Summer in Western New York has been hot and rain-free. By hot I mean a LOT of 90s. That isn’t usual for this area. There are plenty of years we never hit 90°, and I am very happy about that. We all start whining when it hits 85° around here. If winter runs from the end of November through March wellllllll summer better be super awesome.

And it usually is.

High 70s to low 80s are the normal daytime highs in the area in the summer months. When I am telling you I have traveled all over the United States and never found better weather from May – October anywhere in the US, I am not kidding. Summer here is fantastic!

We have been in “near drought” this year. The snow stopped in February, and there wasn’t much of the white stuff before that this winter. That isn’t great for ground-water levels. When May rolled around, our lawns were brown, not green. That is highly unusual. I mean highly unusual. There are plenty of years where the lawns never brown here in August – greening up in spring is nearly unheard of! That just does not happen in this area.

So, with the lack of rain and high heat you’d think the local gardens wouldn’t be producing, right?

Far from it.

Everyone I know with a backyard garden is having a banner year! A few things aren’t producing well… my blackberries for example. They look terrible and have no fruit. Hubby and I went for a ride for raspberries last month and I asked the guy where we purchased (we have bought at this farm stand before) when his blackberries were going to be ready. He told me “next year”. LOL Oh well, at least I felt a bit better knowing that my blackberries were not alone in having a rough year. In the meantime, Hubby and I thoroughly enjoyed that fruit farm’s raspberries and blueberries!!

Invasion of the Cucumbers. It is time for a mid-summer gardening update!


The front of two earth boxes. The cukes have taken over!


Let’s start with this post’s name… invasion of the cucumbers.

Since Hubby and I winter in Florida, I need to purchase my plants ground-ready at the local nursery. I go to the same place every year. This year I decided to buy 9 bean plants (we love beans!) and 3 cucumber plants. Wellllll someone mis-marked something at the nursery. I ended up with 3 yellow beans, 2 green beans and 7 cucumber plants!

That’s a whole lotta cucumbers.

I planted in my earth boxes as normal. We had yellow beans early, and they really produced. The cucumbers have done their level best to crowd out those yellow beans the last few weeks, but we are still getting a few every day.

Invasion of the Cucumbers. It is time for a mid-summer gardening update!


The back of two earth boxes. Tons of cucumber flowers!


The green beans I planted in the earth box with the stand ended up ended up being two green beans and four cucumber plants (this was the mis-marked 6 pack). I did get some green beans from those two plants, but not many … those cukes really like their space!!

Invasion of the Cucumbers. It is time for a mid-summer gardening update!


The cucumbers, they hide!


To date we have harvested about 25 cucumbers. There are at least 25 more little ones growing outside with at least 100 more blooms. We are over-run with cucumbers, and it is only going to get worse. I’ve made cucumber caprese salad, cucumber salad and freezer pickles. We’ve given away cucumbers. It is the never-ending cucumber yield.

Invasion of the Cucumbers. It is time for a mid-summer gardening update!


Those were picked Friday and Saturday. Hubby went out Friday morning and brought some in, I went out Friday afternoon and brought more in. Every day we go outside and see how many more cucumbers we have! And we can only give so many away before people will start ducking us.

Invasion of the Cucumbers. It is time for a mid-summer gardening update!


We have a single cherry tomato plant. It is so top heavy we had to get out some snow plow sticks to support the cage, and then support the entire base with the chairs from the outdoor table set. We tried a heavier pot with chipped marble, but it still fell over. Next year I will just plant it in the heavier pot to begin with, and maybe hope for a lesser tomato yield? There have also been a ton of cherry tomatoes!

Invasion of the Cucumbers. It is time for a mid-summer gardening update!


Hubby bought one basil plant, and that has pretty much been kept in check. I will end up drying whatever is not used fresh.

Invasion of the Cucumbers. It is time for a mid-summer gardening update!


The oregano bolted early (due to the heat).

Invasion of the Cucumbers. It is time for a mid-summer gardening update!


Invasion of the Cucumbers. It is time for a mid-summer gardening update!


The patio flowers are doing very well.

Invasion of the Cucumbers. It is time for a mid-summer gardening update!


The chamomile is also going crazy!! Even if I don’t harvest the flowers, I just love the smell when I go near that area of the backyard.

Invasion of the Cucumbers. It is time for a mid-summer gardening update!


Invasion of the Cucumbers. It is time for a mid-summer gardening update!


Those are the sad blackberry bushes with one whole piece of fruit. I really hope what caused the blackberries to not produce this year (the weather? a fungus (even though I don’t see one)?) rectifies itself next year. I am considering having Hubby dig them up and put them on his hunting land near the apple and pear trees (but not too near). He said there are wild grape vines there too. On the other hand, one of his garages (yes, I wrote “one of” – Hubby has a lot of junk) has raspberries growing in the yard, so maybe that would be a better choice?

All-in-all the growing season is moving along very well. While I planted little, my perennials – sans blackberries – are doing as well as I could hope during this hot, dry summer.

How is your garden growing this year?


Disclosure: the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• If you enjoyed this post, be sure to sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life weekly newsletter, and never miss another article!

• For more Garden posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life
Return to top of page