Summer Gardening

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


Summer Gardening

So after the slow spring gardening start, it was not until mid-July that any of my veggies started to produce. We have had more than our fair share of rain in 2017, and the temps have been seasonal to above normal. With all the rain I had some garden-fails. Actually a lot of fails this year.

Our green bean crop which is usually fabulous yielded whopping 50 green beans this year. We are still eating green beans I froze in 2016, but the 2017 harvest is long gone. I do not think it was the entire area, however, as I have purchased fresh green beans at garden stands for a very reasonable price.

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


Our Roma tomatoes had a round of blossom rot. I was kinda surprised because I had a hefty dose of lime in there when I mixed up my potting mix (Miracle Grow) + fertilizer + lime mixture. I added more lime (it is almost like a layer of paste), as well as some ground up eggshells and knocked the blossom “tails” off each tomato and they seem to have recovered. But, I lost a good 15-20 tomatoes before that.

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


The Roma tomatoes in the ground are late ripening, but so much larger and untouched by the blossom rot as opposed to the Roma tomatoes in the city picker boxes.

Still, I will have plenty to freezing tomatoes later – which was the whole purpose for those four plants!

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


After the rabbits had eaten all the green pepper plants (they never had a chance to root or blossom!) in the ground, I was left with green pepper plants in the city picker boxes. We have a few green peppers, but nothing thrilling. I bought some enormous ones at a farmer stand this past weekend, and I guess that is what I will have to continue to do for fresh green peppers this year.

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


The banana peppers are in an earth box and doing ok. I grew them for Hubby’s Stuffed Banana Pepper Soup Recipe. I have enough for 4-5 batches, so I guess they were successful.

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


I planted my basil near my blackberry bushes this year. I was not sure how that would turn out since that soil is acidic (I had holly bushes there for years!). The basil is smaller than normal and took a while to get going, but it tastes great and yields enough for our purposes.

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


After last year’s cucumber invasion, I only planted three (or four, I do not recall exactly) cucumber plants this year. And I still got a load!! We have been eating cucumber caprese salad two to three times a week, but I am pretty sure it is time to either freeze those cukes, or start making cucumber salad by the gallon. Already people are turning down my “generous” offer of cucumbers, so doorbell ditching is my only other opetion.

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


Under our patio, I have a container of hens and chicks. I plan on planting them in the ground soon, so they have a chance for next year. Two of them shot off these lovely flowers that lasted for over a month!

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


This is the backyard chamomile – I think it is three or four years old now. I had this bright idea to get a few more plants and try the chamomile up front (because it smells so good!).

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


So, I planted five little (2″) plants. Two died right away. And the other three have had to be cut back several times!! I could provide tea for the entire neighborhood!! Those plants have really taken off.

So my losses? The blackberry bushes are not back to where they should be. I keep asking hubby to take them up to the hunting land – maybe they’d flourish there? Or the deer would have a sweet treat.

My patio tomatoes (different than my Roma) gave off about 30 tomatoes and then stopped producing.

The beans were a bust this year. The ground green peppers were also a bust.

Those are my wins and losses in my garden so far this year!

How is your garden growing this summer?!


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Simple Steps to Keep Your Vegetable Garden Producing!

Simple Steps to Keep Your Vegetable Garden Producing! Make the most of your growing season with these simple tips! Easy, yet effective steps you can take to keep your home vegetable garden happy, and producing, all season long.


Simple Steps to Keep Your Vegetable Garden Producing!

Make the most of your growing season with these simple tips! Easy, yet effective steps you can take to keep your home vegetable garden happy, and producing, all season long.

In the early stages of spring, it seems that we spend a lot of time and energy planning and planting our gardens. We are all hyped-up for the spring growing season and thrilled to be out in the garden. As the year progresses though, we sometimes run out of steam – either through lack of production, turning our energies toward different endeavors, or, we just lack time to dedicate to our garden (life happens!). So, how do we keep our vegetables at optimum production as the growing season moves forward?

Whether you have a traditional garden plot, patio planters or boxes, or raised beds, there are some basic practices that keep your garden looking sharp as well as providing your vegetables with their best chance at peak production.

Simple Steps to Keep Your Vegetable Garden Producing! Make the most of your growing season with these simple tips! Easy, yet effective steps you can take to keep your home vegetable garden happy, and producing, all season long.


• Beginning with your soil mix, before you sow seeds or sets your transplants, consider what your soil looks like. For vegetables, it should have about one-third compost mixed in to provide nutrients all season long. If your soil is particularly sandy or heavy clay, you can even mix in a greater quantity of compost. Well-rotted manure can be incorporated, up to about ten percent of your soil. This mix will allow you to spend minimal time on fertilizing your garden during the summer. I use a potting soil mix (Miracle Grow brand), some lime, and plant food in my earth boxes.

• For more on soil, you may want to read about these 10 Common Household Items to Use as Garden Fertilizers!

Simple Steps to Keep Your Vegetable Garden Producing! Make the most of your growing season with these simple tips! Easy, yet effective steps you can take to keep your home vegetable garden happy, and producing, all season long.


• You will also want to discourage any competition for nutrients or sunlight. The main competitor is weeds. Unless you would like to spend all summer pulling weeds out, try to weed early, and often. This way they do not go to seed and perpetuate the cycle. Here are some great tips for weeding your garden.

• Keep a watch out for garden pests. These come in many forms – buggy pests and rodents. These 5 pest repelling plants can help!

Simple Steps to Keep Your Vegetable Garden Producing! Make the most of your growing season with these simple tips! Easy, yet effective steps you can take to keep your home vegetable garden happy, and producing, all season long.


• Tomato Hornworms can clean a plant of leaves in just a day or two. By looking for signs of an infestation, and reacting quickly, you can keep your vegetables in peak production all season long. If you find just one or two pests, you can probably manually pick them off the plants, but larger infestations will require serious treatment. There are many beneficial insects that can be released before an infestation to control pests, too.

• Rodents may be a little more difficult to control (the bunnies got my peppers this year). If you are using raised beds, you can put a lining of chicken wire down before adding your soil mix to help keep burrowing pests out. My brother (and exterminator) uses chicken wire to enclose this garden. He uses a few bricks to hold it in place instead of digging down into the ground. He says it works great (and they have a HUGE garden!)

Simple Steps to Keep Your Vegetable Garden Producing! Make the most of your growing season with these simple tips! Easy, yet effective steps you can take to keep your home vegetable garden happy, and producing, all season long.


• During the summer when your plants are at their peak, keep the ripe produce picked. Plants grow to produce seeds and flowers. If you have more produce than you can handle (amd are not in a position to freeze or can), pick off some of the blooms. It should not hurt future production but will eliminate some of the harvest in the meantime. For leafy plants and annual herbs like basil, keep the flower heads nipped off, and your plants will continue to produce leaves.

• Also, in the heat of summer, water is very important to vegetable growth. If your garden is not getting enough water naturally from rain, you will need to supplement it with a hose. Lack of water can not only kill plants but will cause vegetables to split or shrivel. If your plants are wilting, water them. You may enjoy these practical tips to save water in your garden.

• As your garden starts to wane in late summer, remember to replant those sections where the harvest has been completed. If you planted short-season crops, plan to fill in their space with something else after they have been harvested. Here are some vegetables that are perfect to plant in late summer for a second harvest!

• As the weather turns cooler, you can also use some bed covers to keep your plants producing. This can be a plastic tent over the plants, cold frames over your raised beds, or even moving some of your plants into a greenhouse for the winter. If the weather has turned too cool for tomato plants to set fruit, pick the green ones that are still on the vines, and let them ripen indoors.

You can keep your vegetable garden producing all season long by starting with a good soil mix, a little planning, and routine garden care.


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Easy DIY Butterfly Garden Markers

Easy DIY Butterfly Garden Markers. Simple to make garden markers to help you identify the fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs growing in your backyard or window garden. These are so easy to make, anyone can do it!


Easy DIY Butterfly Garden Markers

Simple to make garden markers to help you identify the fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs growing in your backyard or window garden. These are so easy to make, anyone can do it!

Working in the garden is a wonderful activity that is as rewarding as it is enjoyable. There is something satisfying about seeing something you cared for from the seed up produce beautiful produce, herbs, or flowers. When planting things in the garden we are all looking for beauty and color. And I do not know about you, but I plant so much I sometimes forget what went into the ground! These simple to make garden markers are whimsical, colorful and useful in identifying fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs planted in your garden.

These are made with butterflies but caterpillars, ladybugs, and grasshoppers would also work well in making these garden markers.

Easy DIY Butterfly Garden Markers. Simple to make garden markers to help you identify the fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs growing in your backyard or window garden. These are so easy to make, anyone can do it!


Easy DIY Butterfly Garden Markers Materials:

Plastic Butterflies
• Wire Hangers
Wire Cutters
Black Outdoor Paint
• Foam Paint Brush
• White or Black Permanent Marker
Waterproof Glue

Easy DIY Butterfly Garden Markers. Simple to make garden markers to help you identify the fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs growing in your backyard or window garden. These are so easy to make, anyone can do it!


Easy DIY Butterfly Garden Markers Instructions:

• Cut the straight part of a wire hanger for each butterfly marker. The length of a wire hanger is just about perfect for a garden marker, and these markers are an excellent way to use up wire hangers gathered from dry cleaning.

Easy DIY Butterfly Garden Markers. Simple to make garden markers to help you identify the fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs growing in your backyard or window garden. These are so easy to make, anyone can do it!


• Use black outdoor paint to paint the wires black. You don’t have to do this step, but I liked how the black looked in the garden better than the white.

Easy DIY Butterfly Garden Markers. Simple to make garden markers to help you identify the fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs growing in your backyard or window garden. These are so easy to make, anyone can do it!


• Once the paint dries, flip the butterflies over and add a line of glue across the butterfly bodies.

Easy DIY Butterfly Garden Markers. Simple to make garden markers to help you identify the fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs growing in your backyard or window garden. These are so easy to make, anyone can do it!


• Stick a wire into the glue, then add another layer to seal the wire inside the glue.
• Wait for 24 hours for the glue to completely dry.

Easy DIY Butterfly Garden Markers. Simple to make garden markers to help you identify the fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs growing in your backyard or window garden. These are so easy to make, anyone can do it!


• Once the glue is dry, write the name of your plants on the wings of the butterflies using a permanent marker.

Easy DIY Butterfly Garden Markers. Simple to make garden markers to help you identify the fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs growing in your backyard or window garden. These are so easy to make, anyone can do it!


• If you grow something else later, you can wipe away the marker with a rubbing alcohol wipe and write in a different name for the new plant.

Easy DIY Butterfly Garden Markers. Simple to make garden markers to help you identify the fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs growing in your backyard or window garden. These are so easy to make, anyone can do it!


• Place the butterfly garden markers in your garden or use them in potted plants so you can easily remember what plants you have growing in your garden!


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