75 Alkaline Friendly Plants

75 Alkaline Friendly Plants. If you have alkaline soil, you need plants that flourish within an alkaline soil environment. Flowers, vegetables, shrubs, and trees all have specific soil needs; these 75 Alkaline Friendly Plants are great choices for your gardening and landscaping needs.





75 Alkaline Friendly Plants

So why is a soil considered alkaline? Well, it is defined by pH. So, what exactly is soil pH?

• The pH soil scale ranges from 0 to 14.
• A pH of 7 is neutral, which is neither acid nor alkaline.
• A pH below 7 is acid.
• A pH above 7 is alkaline.

A pH of 5.5 is 10 times more acidic than a pH of 6.5. A pH of 8.5 is 10 times more alkaline than a pH of 7.5. A soil test will determine pH.

You can test your soil’s pH with through your local County Cooperative Extension Office (in New York State there is a Cornell Cooperative Extension in every county), or using a store bought soil tester or kit. You should test your soil before beginning any new landscape or vegetable growing project.

Here are some of the best soil ph tester kits you can buy online (I went with the reviews):

Soilster
MoonCity
Luster Leaf (This is Home Depot, so you can get it in-store too)

From the USDA:

Soil testing of the garden site is essential. Soil tests provide valuable information about fertility and pH and provide the basis for fertilizer and liming recommendations. Plan on soil testing the season before the garden is planted, preferably before the ground freezes. This allows for planning of fall applications of nutrients and lime to prepare the garden site for spring planting. Another benefit of fall testing is that fertilizer prices are more likely to be discounted during that season.

Many plants do well in acidic, slightly acidic, neutral, near neutral soils, alkaline soils; in other words, they will grow fairly well in some to all ranges as long as they are not extreme. Some plants prefer a highly acidic soil.
Soil is more likely alkaline due to the limestone parent material when soils were formed. If the pH of your soil is greater than 7.5, then the soil may contain a large amount of free calcium carbonate. Wood ash will raise the soil pH and make the soil more alkaline.

If you are looking for a list of acid-loving plants, check out my list of 75 Acid Loving Plants!

Below is a list of alkaline friendly plants you can grow in alkaline soil. All of these plants listed below have some alkaline soil level requirements. Some love alkaline soil more than others – they range from liking slightly alkaline soil to loving very alkaline soil. It was interesting to me how many vegetables went on this list, and how few flowers or fruits. I cannot say I grow too many alkaline friendly plants, mostly chives, oregano, and beans.

75 Alkaline Friendly Plants

• Artichoke
• Arugula
• Asparagus
• Aster, New England
• Beauty Bush
• Beans
• Beet
• Bigroot Geranium
• Bluebell
• Boston Ivy
Broccoli
• Broccoli Rabe
• Brussels Sprouts
• Cabbage
• California Lilacs
• Campanula
• Cantaloupe
• Cauliflower
• Chinese Cabbage
• Celeriac
Chives

75 Alkaline Friendly Plants. If you have alkaline soil, you need plants that flourish within an alkaline soil environment. Flowers, vegetables, shrubs, and trees all have specific soil needs; these 75 Alkaline Friendly Plants are great choices for your gardening and landscaping needs.


• Chokeberry
• Cilantro
• Clematis Vine
• Cockscomb
• Collard
• Crab Apple
• Crocus
• Emerald Gaity Shrubs
• Endive
• Escarole
• Fennel
• Forsythia
• Green Velvet Boxwood
• Hebe ‘Great Orme’
• Honeysuckle
• Horseradish
• Hyacinth
• Iceland Poppy
• Jack Frost
• Japanese Wisteria
• Jerusalem Artichoke
Kale
• Kohlrabi
• Lemon Mint
• Lettuce
• Lilacs
• Lima Beans
• Marjoram

75 Alkaline Friendly Plants. If you have alkaline soil, you need plants that flourish within an alkaline soil environment. Flowers, vegetables, shrubs, and trees all have specific soil needs; these 75 Alkaline Friendly Plants are great choices for your gardening and landscaping needs.


• Mock Orange
• Mustard
• Nectarines
• Okra
• Onion
• Oregano
• Parsnip
• Peaches
Peas
• Photinia Berries
• Radicchio
• Radish
• Rhubarb
• Sage
• Shasta Daisy
• Snapdragon
• Spiraea
• Summer Squash
• Swiss Chard
• Tarragon
• Tomatillo
• Trumpet Honeysuckle
• Watercress
• Watermelon
• Weigela
• Worcester Gold

More reading:

10 Common Household Items to Use as Garden Fertilizers
20 Fabulous Bulbs to Plant in the Fall for Spring Blooms
Tips for Growing an Herb Garden Year Round
Vegetables That Are Perfect to Plant in Late Summer

Sources:

Farmer’s Almanac
Horticulture Magazine
Iowa State
University of Minnesota
USDA
Wildflower Information

Do you have a favorite alkaline friendly plant?


Disclosure: the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• For more Gardening posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• If you enjoyed this post, be sure to sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life weekly newsletter, and never miss another article!



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75 Acid Loving Plants

75 Acid Loving Plants. If you have acidic soil, you need plants that flourish within an acid soil environment. Flowers, vegetables, shrubs, and trees all have specific soil needs; these 75 acid loving plants are great choices for your gardening and landscaping needs.





75 Acid Loving Plants

If you have acidic soil, you need plants that flourish within an acid soil environment. Flowers, vegetables, shrubs, and trees all have specific soil needs; these 75 acid loving plants are great choices for your gardening and landscaping needs.

So why is a soil considered an acidic? Well, it is defined by pH. What exactly is soil pH?

• The pH soil scale ranges from 0 to 14.
• A pH of 7 is neutral, which is neither acid nor alkaline.
• A pH below 7 is acid.
• A pH above 7 is alkaline.

A pH of 5.5 is 10 times more acidic than a pH of 6.5. A pH of 8.5 is 10 times more alkaline than a pH of 7.5. A soil test will determine pH.

You can test your soil’s pH with through your local County Cooperative Extension Office (in New York State there is a Cornell Cooperative Extension in every county), or using a store bought soil tester or kit. You should test your soil before beginning any new landscape or vegetable growing project.

Here are some of the best soil ph tester kits you can buy online (I went with the reviews):

Soilster
MoonCity
Luster Leaf (This is Home Depot, so you can get it in-store too)

From the USDA:

Soil testing of the garden site is essential. Soil tests provide valuable information about fertility and pH and provide the basis for fertilizer and liming recommendations. Plan on soil testing the season before the garden is planted, preferably before the ground freezes. This allows for planning of fall applications of nutrients and lime to prepare the garden site for spring planting. Another benefit of fall testing is that fertilizer prices are more likely to be discounted during that season.

Many plants do well in acidic, slightly acidic, neutral, near neutral soils, alkaline soils; in other words, they will grow fairly well in some to all ranges as long as they are not extreme. Some plants prefer a highly acidic soil. To make a soil more acidic, sphagnum peat, elemental sulfur, aluminum sulfate, iron sulfate, acidifying nitrogen, and organic mulches can be used.

Some plants prefer a highly alkaline soil. Liming will raise the pH of acid soils. You can improve soil conditions by adding well-rotted manure (not fresh manure) and compost.

Below is a list of acid-loving plants you can grow in acidic soil. I also grow several types of acid loving plants together when they need to be acidic soil. It is also easy to feed plants when they are all happy to get the same type of plant food. I use Holly Plant Food to feed my acid loving plants.

All of these plants listed below have some acid soil level requirements. Some love acidic soil more than others – they range from liking slightly acidic soil to loving very acidic soil. Be careful with very acidic soil if your plants do not need a high acid soil to grow, as highly acidic soil can inhibit the numbers of flowers and fruits in some plants. Make sure you read up on the exact soil requirements for the fruit, vegetable, flower, tree or shrub you are planting so you know the exact type of soil your investment (because make no mistake about it, landscape and gardens are investments) will thrive in!

75 Acid Loving Plants List:

• Amaryllis
• Andromeda
• Aronia
• Arugula
• Aster
• Astilbe
• Azalea
Basil
• Bayberry

75 Acid Loving Plants. If you have highly acidic soil, you need plants that flourish within an acid soil environment. Flowers, vegetables, shrubs, and trees all have specific soil needs; these 75 acid loving plants are great choices for your gardening and landscaping needs.


Blackberries
• Bleeding Heart
• Blueberry
• Broccoli
• Catnip
• Camellia
• Cauliflower
Celery
• Chicory
• Clethra
• Cleyera
• Cranberry
• Dogwood
Eggplant
• Evergreen
• Fern
• Fir
• Fothergilla
• Gardenia
• Garlic
• Gourds
• Heath

• Heather
• Hemlock
• Hibiscus
• Holly
• Hosta (Plantation Lily)
• Huckleberry
• Hydrangea
• Inkberry
• Ixora
• Japanese Silver Grass
• Juniper
• Leeks
• Leucothoe
• Lingonberries
• Lily-of-the-Valley
• Lupine
• Magnolia
• Mahonia
• Molinia Arundinacea
• Molinia Caerulea
• Mountain Ash
• Mountain Laurel
• Oak
• Pachysandra

75 Acid Loving Plants. If you have acidic soil, you need plants that flourish within an acid soil environment. Flowers, vegetables, shrubs, and trees all have specific soil needs; these 75 acid loving plants are great choices for your gardening and landscaping needs.


Parsley
• Pawpaw
• Peanuts
• Phlox
• Pieris
• Pine
Potatoes
• Pumpkin
• Raspberry
• Rhododendron
• Rhubarb
• Shallots
• Spinach
• Spruce
Squash
Strawberry
• Sweet Potatoes
• Weeping Nutka Grass
• White Cedar
• White Sage
• White Mugwort
• Witch Hazel
• Woodsorel

More reading:

10 Common Household Items to Use as Garden Fertilizers
How to Harvest and Dry Basil
How to Grow Eggpant
How to Plant and Harvest Potatoes
How to Grow Strawberries

Sources:
Bluestem
Gardens Alive
Iowa State
Penn State
USDA

Do you have a favorite acid loving plant?


Disclosure: the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• For more Gardening posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

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Best Places to Buy Gardening Seeds

Best Places to Buy Gardening Seeds. This is a list of options for the purchase of gardening seeds locally, as well as the online purchase of your vegetable seeds, flower seeds, and herb seeds.





Best Places to Buy Gardening Seeds

It is that time of year! Time to start growing your garden seedlings for spring planting. You may have already decided what you are going to plant, and now are wondering where to get your seeds. If you are wondering where to buy gardening seeds, I am here to help! Below are a number of options for the local purchase or online purchase of your vegetable seeds, flower seeds, and herb seeds. I did break down where you can get good organic seeds online.

First, an explanation of the types of seeds available for purchase:

Non-GMO Seeds: As far as I know, you are only able to purchase GMO seeds if you are a farmer. As a regular gardening consumer, you are buying non-GMO seeds online and at the local garden center (if you worry it is possible to have some contamination, or some money going to a GMO company some seeds are labeled non-GMO as an assurance).

For those that are looking for a definition of GMO seeds (because we have heard it a lot the last few years), it is: a genetically modified organism that is the result of a laboratory process where genes from the DNA of one species are extracted and artificially forced into the genes of an unrelated plant or animal. Here is more information about GMO if you are curious. And this Popular Science article tells you how to do it!

Hybrid seeds – a hybrid seed is a seed produced by cross-pollinating two (or more) plants. An F1 hybrid is a variety that has been produced by the carefully controlled cross breeding of two parent plants specially chosen for their different desirable qualities such as plant type, disease resistance, uniformity, crop yield, unique color and so on. Hybrid seeds can also be produced organically (by insect, bird, wind, humans).

Open-pollinated seeds – when pollination occurs by insect, bird or wind.

Heirloom seeds – is the plant heritage. They generally have been passed down from generation to generation (thought of as 50+ years old). An heirloom variety is open-pollinated, but not all open-pollinated plants are heirlooms varieties.

Organic seeds – organic seeds are harvested from plants grown without synthetic chemical fertilizers, pesticides or fungicides. They, therefore have no residues from those chemicals.

You will need to decide what type of seeds you want to plant. If you would like to convert to an organic garden, you would purchase organic seeds. Here are some tips for how to convert to an organic garden.

If you are planning a theme garden, such as a patio garden or perhaps a salsa garden, you have more options.

Many people are all about heirloom tomatoes, but I have to tell you, blight took such a toll on my heirloom tomatoes a few years ago that I had to switch to a hybrid tomato because the variety was heartier. Last year, we went with cherry tomatoes.

Just be aware that there are pros and cons to each type of seed. Heartiness, taste, ease of growth as well as your climate, all should factor into what type of plants and seeds you grow in your garden.

Where to buy gardening seeds locally:

Home Depot – make sure you sign up for the Home Depot Gardening Club for coupons and discounts.

Lowes Garden Center – sign up for the Lowes Garden Club

• Your local Garden Nursery!! You can also get expert advice from the Master Gardener on hand to help you determine what fruits, vegetables, and herbs will grow best in your climate and local soil (once transferred).

• Your local Gardening Co-op There are not too many nationally, but they are growing. (haha, get it? they are gro… er, nevermind)

• Ask at your local CSA! – there are specific seed and plant CSAs, as well as the everyday variety community supported agriculture farms that may/may not sell you seeds.

Where to buy gardening seeds online:

These are some of the foremost names in online gardening seeds. Many of these places online sell Non-Hybrid and Organic seeds- vegetable, herb and flower seeds.

Burpee – they definitely have a lot of product and have been around a long, long time.

R.H. Shumway – specializes in heirloom varieties of vegetable and flowers. Many of the farm seed were developed in the 1940s and 1950s.

Rare Seeds – they offer over 1850 fine varieties of seeds, some of which you have probably never heard of! They claim to be America’s top source for heirloom seeds.

Seed Savers – a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of heirloom vegetables, flowers and fruits. They sell Non GMO Vegetable Seeds, Heirloom Vegetable Seeds, Organic Vegetable Seeds.
Seed Savers Exchange is a tax-exempt 501(c)3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation of heirloom seeds.
They offer a membership, and membership benefits.

Johnny’s Seeds – one of the nine original signers of the Safe Seed Pledge.

This is the safe seed pledge:
Agriculture and seeds provide the basis upon which our lives depend. We must protect this foundation as a safe and genetically stable source for future generations. For the benefit of all farmers, gardeners, and consumers who want an alternative,

We pledge that we do not knowingly buy, sell, or trade genetically-engineered seeds or plants.

The mechanical transfer of genetic material outside of natural reproductive methods and between genera, families, or kingdoms, poses great biological risks as well as economic, political, and cultural threats. We feel that genetically engineered varieties have been insufficiently tested prior to public release. More research and testing are necessary to further assess the potential risks of genetically-engineered seeds. Further, we wish to support agricultural progress that leads to healthier soils, genetically diverse agricultural ecosystems, and ultimately healthy people and communities.

Johnny’s Seeds sellsCertified Organic Seeds, F1 Hybrid Seeds (seeds that are a cross, not an open pollinated strain), Open-Pollinated & Heirloom Seeds.

If you are looking for more seed catalog places to buy from (it is not a recommendation, it is merely a list), The Farmer’s Almanac has a pretty extensive list here.

Safe Planting Times in Your Area
How to Grow Garden Seeds

Where is your favorite place to purchase gardening seeds?


Disclosure: the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• For more Gardening posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• If you enjoyed this post, be sure to sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life weekly newsletter, and never miss another article!



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