How to Keep Your Garden Alive While You Are on Vacation

How to Keep Your Garden Alive While You Are on Vacation. Tips on how to prepare your garden before you leave for vacation, and what to do when you are away from the house for an extended period of time, so your plants are alive and thriving when you return home.



How to Keep Your Garden Alive While You Are on Vacation

One of the biggest challenges a gardener faces is what to do about the garden while away on vacation. Summer is the season for family vacations, but it is also the biggest season for your garden. So much can go wrong when you are not tending your garden daily! The plants can suffer from too much sun with not enough water, damaging bugs and fungus may set in…it can be tough out there for your flowers, fruits, and vegetables when left on their own! The good news is you can keep your garden alive while on vacation with a little planning.

If you will only be gone for a weekend vacation your garden may not need any care or consideration at all. Shy of a wild wind storm or unexpected hail, most gardens can tend to themselves over two or three days and turn out just fine. Before leaving home for an extended period of time, give your garden plants a deep watering, and if necessary, some fresh mulch can aid in keeping your garden thriving over the weekend.

When you plan a week or longer vacation your garden needs a bit more attention. The first step should be to plan for someone physically stop at your house and check on your garden. Even with the best automation (sprinkler system, earth boxes, drip hose) and prior planning done before you leave town, your garden is still susceptible to pests (rabbits, deer, bugs). By having a friend stop by and check on your plants, their intervention and possibly treating an issue can save a lot of heartaches later. As a thank you measure, you can encourage the attendee to harvest any fruits or vegetables that ripen while you are gone, or, if the fruits of your labor are not ready yet (ha ha!), a bag of produce at harvest time would not be remiss. If your garden helper has all the produce s/he needs from their own garden, an offer to reciprocate when they go on vacation would be an excellent trade!

If you have a sprinkler system installed at your home, make certain you have a rain gauge installed. That will stop your sprinkler from going on when there is water in the gutters. Have you ever seen sprinklers on during a storm? I always shake my head. A $50 rain gauge can save so much water.

An automatic Wi-Fi enabled watering system can be your best friend. These devices are handy for when you need to leave town. Simply check the weather and set your garden to be watered right from your smartphone or tablet. This is really handy for any garden. Add watering globes or homemade ones using wine bottles filled and inserted into the soil to help keep your potted plants thriving while you are on vacation.

Before you leave town, tend your garden by pulling weeds and assess your mulch to see if a fresh layer is needed to keep weeds from taking over while you are away. Prune plants (garden vegetables – check for the correct time of year for trees and shrubs) before you go on vacation to reduce any dead and decaying plant material that will call to pests you do not want in your garden. Inspect plants and treat them for any pests already invading before they have a chance to take over while you are away. If aphids are a common problem for you be proactive and order a batch of ladybugs to be set free before you leave.

Feed your garden before you leave. Your garden will grow and thrive after being well fed. Use a liquid fertilizer or fertilizer pellets that can work its way past your mulch layer. A well-fed garden is stronger for fighting off pests and handling variations in the water cycle.

When you return from vacation your garden will most likely need some attention. Spend a couple hours when you get home harvesting any crops, pulling weeds, and inspecting your garden for bugs that have snuck their way into your garden. If you did not feed your plants before leaving on vacation take a moment to do it when you get home.

Your garden can thrive while you are away on vacation and if all else fails the time you took to prep before leaving home will reduce damage and allow your garden to bounce back when you get home and are able to care for it again daily.


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101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables from Your Garden

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables from Your Garden. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to watermelon, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!



101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables from Your Garden

Do you grow fruits and vegetables in your backyard garden? Would you like to preserve that harvest? These canning ideas and recipes are perfect for your harvested fruit and vegetables. There are over 100 canning recipes listed below. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to watermelon, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!

Note: these are hot water bath or steam canning recipes.

If you prefer to freeze your vegetables for later use, click here for the Ultimate Guide to Freezing Vegetables!

Vegetable Canning Recipes

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Asparagus Canning Recipes

Fresh, green asparagus is a wonderful, versatile that can be steamed, roasted, battered, grilled, sautéed and canned!

Easy Pickled Asparagus | Confessions of an Overworked Mom
Garlicky Pickled Asparagus | Minnesota From Scratch
Pickled & Peppered Asparagus | A Farmgirl’s Dabbles

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Beets Canning Recipes

Beets have been cultivated since the middle ages. They are generally thought of as a hardy, autumn vegetable. Full of folate and manganese, beets are usually pickled when canned.

Pickled Beets | Reuse Grow Enjoy
Pickled Beets Recipe | Sidewalk Shoes
Pickled Beets with Honey | Confessions of an Overworked Mom

Brussels Sprouts Canning Recipes

Hot Spiced Brussels Sprouts | The Stray Needle
Pickled Brussels Sprouts Recipe | Hezzi-D’s Books and Cooks

Cabbage Canning Recipes

Canning Cabbage (How to Make Sauerkraut) | Little House Living
Unstuffed Cabbage Roll Soup | Canning Granny

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Carrots Canning Recipes

Carrots are easy to grow and do well in raised beds and pots. Canning carrots is a great way to preserve them to flavor soups ad stews all year round.

Canned Carrots Recipe
Carrot Cake Jam | Flour on my Face

Corn Canning Recipes

Canned Sweet Corn | Old World Garden Farms
Canning Corn | Hickery Holler Farm

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Cucumber Canning Recipes

Cucumbers are essential to any canning garden. Pickles are one of the most popular home canned items and perfect for beginners to get started canning. If you have children these home canned goodies will disappear in no time.

Bread and Butter Pickles | The Hungry Bluebird
Grilled Pickles (this is a unique canning recipe) | The BBQ Bastard
Spicy State Fair Bread And Butter Pickles | Bless Her Heat Y’all
Spicy Sweet and Sour Dill Pickles | Happy Foods
Small Batch Crunchy Canned Dill Pickles | Simple Seasonal
Russian Dill Pickles | Happy Kitchen. Rocks.
Sweet Cucumber Relish | Cottage at the Crossroads

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Eggplant comes in many different varieties and colors. Some of them even bear fruit. No matter what type of eggplant you choose to grow, there are several things that you should consider before making a decision on what type you should plant. Click here for some tips on how to grow eggplant!

Eggplant “Tapenade” | Brokem Teepee
Pickled Eggplant with Basil | Putting up with Erin
Pickled Fairy Tale Eggplant | Food in Jars

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Green Beans Canning Recipes

Beans are a great vegetable to serve with family meals and really easy for beginning canners. Adding fresh herbs, peppers, or onions to your home canned green beans is a great way to make mealtime easy. If you take the time to grow and can your own beans for soups and chili you can do the same to save time later.

Canned Green Beans Recipe
Canning Green Beans | Grow a Good Life
How to Can Green Beans | Creative Homemaking

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Garlic Canning Recipes

Canned Garlic Recipe
Mom’s version of Adjika | Natasha’s Kitchen

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Onion Canning Recipes

Onions are a great staple for canning salsa and adding flavor to any of your favorite home canned veggies. These are great to add to cans of vegetables you plan to add to soups and stews for quick and easy cooking later.

Canning Onion Confit | Doris and Jilly Cook
Dilly Pickled Onion Rings | Buy This Cook That
How to Can Caramelized Onions | Reformation Acres
Vidalia Onion and Peach Salsa | Cooking With Mary and Friends

Peas Canning Recipes

Peas are a simple to can vegetables that can be used for many things throughout the year making them a great frugal vegetable to can, add some peppers and onions for a quick flavorful side dish later.

Canning Green Peas | Canning Granny
Canning Grean Peas recipe | Hickery Holler Farm
How to Can Shell Peas | The Homesteading Hippy

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Peppers Canning Recipes

Peppers are essential to making homemade salsa and are a great flavor addition to home canned green beans, peas, corn, and carrots.

Homemade Hot Sauce Recipe
Garlic Banana Peppers | A Thirfy Mom
Pickled Jalapeños en Escabèche | Palatable Pastime
Rick’s Pickled Jalapeño Peppers | My Life Cookbook

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Potatoes

Potatoes are the number one vegetable crop in the world. While they originated in South America, potatoes are now available throughout the year in our grocery stores as they are harvested somewhere every month of the year. If you would like to learn how to plant and harvest potaoes, simply click here.

Canned Potatoes Recipe
How to Can Sweet Potatoes | A Modern Homestead

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Rhubarb Canning Recipes

Rhubarb is a tart perennial that is actually classified as a vegetable. Most of us think of rhubarb in terms of strawberry and rhubarb desserts, but it can also be canned with delicious results!

Rhubarb Marmalade | Splash of Flavours
Spiced Vanilla Rhubarb Jam | Hezzi-D’s Books and Cooks

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Squash Canning Recipes

Squash plants encompass many different subspecies of plants. In the squash family, you have cucumbers, zucchini from yellow crookneck to pattypans to green beauties. Then add in your winter squash like acorn, butternut, and gourds. Don’t forget the many varieties of pumpkins that also fall into this category from Jack O’Lanterns to minis and sugars to Giants. All of these plants are perfect to get into your garden around the 4th of July. If you would like to learn more about which vegetables are perfect to plant in late summer, be sure to click here.

Canned Squash recipe
Old Fashioned Southern Squash Pickles | Cooking with Mary and Friends

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Tomato Canning Recipes

Tomatoes are a staple for any canning garden. The possibilities are nearly endless from tomato soup to sauces, and salsa you can never grow too many tomatoes for canning.

Russian Grandma’s Pickled Tomatoes | Happy Kitchen. Rocks.
Herbed Spaghetti Sauce | Lively Table
Homemade Canned Spaghetti Sauce | Cottage at the Crossroads
Homemade Canned Tomato Salsa | Noshing with the Nolands
Homemade Sugar Free Pizza Sauce | Carb Yum
Homemade Tomato Passata | krumpli
Peeling Tomatoes Tips | Walking on Sunshine
Seasoned Tomato Sauce Recipe | Grow a Good Life

Zuchinni Canning Recipes

Sweet Smokey Zucchini Salsa Recipe | Reluctant Entertainer
Zuchinni Bread and Butter Pickles | Healthy Canning
Zucchini Hamburger Relish Recipe | Attainable Sustainable

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Fruit Canning Recipes

Apple Canning Recipes

Apples are cultivated worldwide as a fruit tree. While growing fruit trees isn’t for everyone, be sure to click here for tips on growing fruit trees. You do not need an orchard of apple trees for good production. My great-grandmother only had 3 apple trees and she canned enough for a family of six plus leftovers! We have several on Hubby’s hunting land, and they produce well.

Apple Fig Chutney | Farm Fresh Feasts
Canned Cinnamon Apples Recipe
Easy Crock-Pot Apple Butter | Frog’s Lilypad
Homemade Apple Sauce | Attainable Sustainable

Apricot Canning Recipes

Apricot Pineapple Jam | A Thirfty Mom
Apricot Sauce | Broken Teepee
No Pectin Apricot Jam | Curious Cuisiniere

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Blackberry Canning Recipes

Blueberries are great to grow (especially thornless blackberry bushes!) and make wonderful jam and pie filling option for canning. Click here to learn how to grow blackberries!

Chocolate Blackberry Preserves | The Redhead Baker
How to Can Blackberry Jam | Joyfully Thriving

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Blueberry Canning Recipes

Blueberries are great for growing as ornamental shrubs that just so happen to give you a great jam and pie filling option for canning. IF you are looking to replace common shrubs in your landscaping with something edible blueberries are a great option.

Blueberry Conserve | Stocking The Larder
Blueberry Pie Filling
Strawberry Blueberry Jam | Flour on My Face

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Cherry Canning Recipes

A cherry is a stone fruit. Fresh picked cherries are truly delicious (my grandparents had a cherry tree in their backyard), and while we normally think to eat them fresh, jams, jellies, and moonshine cherries are all well known canned cherry recipes.

Brandied Cherry Berry Preserves | Homespun Seasonal Living
Cherry Lemon Jam | Food Lust People Love
Moonshine Cherries Recipe

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Grape Canning Recipes

Grapes produce some wonderfully delicious jellies and jams. A home canning staple!

Easy Homemade Muscadine Jelly | Frog’s Lilypad
Honey Sweetened Concord Grape Jelly Recipe | Grow a Good Life

Lemon and Lime Canning Recipes

Homemade Lime or Lemon Curd (and safe home canning of lemon curd) | The 350 Degree Oven

Nectarine Canning Recipes

Nectarine Kumquat Habanero Chutney | Food Lust People Love
Nectarine Maple Vanilla Butter | Homespun Seasonal Living

Orange Canning Recipes

Canning Oranges | Little House Living
Homemade Sweet Orange Marmalade(Not the bitter type!) | The 350 Degree Oven
How to Can Orange Juice | New Life on a Homestead

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Peach Canning Recipes

Peach Green Tomato Chow Chow | Buy This Cook That
Peach Pepper Jelly Recipe | How to Have It All
Peach Pie Filling | Creative Homemaking
Peach Salas with Golden Plums and Roasted Hatch Chiles | Farm Fresh Feasts

Pear Canning Recipes

Canned Pears Recipe | Mostly Food Stuffs
Cinnamon Pear Jam Recipe | On the Outskirts of Town
Salted Carmel Pear Butter | Knit & Nosh

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Plum Canning Recipes

How to Can Red Plum Jam | A Modern Homestead
Plum Jam Recipe (No Peel, No Pectin!) | Natasha’s Kitchen
Spicy Plum Sauce | Spash of Flavours

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Raspberry Canning Recipes

Raspberries are great for growing around fence lines and make for plenty of fresh fruit ripe for jams, jellies, and pie fillings.

How to Can Raspberry Jelly | New Life on a Homestead
Pressue Cooker Raaspberry Curd | Pressure Cooking Today

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Strawberry Canning Recipes

Strawberries make great jam or jelly. Strawberries can be grown in pots or used as a groundcover in well-mulched garden beds coming back nd spreading year after year. Click here to learn how to grow your very pwn strawberry patch!

Homemade Strawberry Jam with Brown Sugar without pectin | Happy Foods
Low Sugar Strawberry Jam | Lively Table
Strawberry Lemon Jam | Simple Seasonal

Tangerine Canning Recipes

Tangerine Marmalade | Doris and Jilly Cook
Tangerine Syrup Recipe | The Hip Girl’s Guide to Homemaking

101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables. From asparagus to zucchini and from apples to raspberries, there is a canning recipe for nearly every fruit or vegetable you can grow in your backyard garden!


Watermelon Canning Recipes

Candied Watermelon Rind | Yummy Smells
Watermelon Butter | Palatable Pastime
Watermelon Jelly Recipe | Daily Dish Recipes
Sweet Watermelon Rind Pickles | Cinnamon Spice and Everything Nice


Disclosure: the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• For more Recipes on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• For more Gardening posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

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Tools You Need for Your Garden

Tools You Need for Your Garden. Whether you are a beginning gardener or an intermediate gardener, chances are you need some gardening tools. Here is a great list of gardening tools for the beginner and intermediate gardener.



Tools You Need for Your Garden

Wondering what tools you need for your garden? Whether you are a beginning gardener or an intermediate gardener, chances are you need some gardening tools. Over the years, I have purchased my fair share of gardening tools, sometimes the same tools two years in a row – not because I bought cheap and they broke – but because Hubby snitches them and takes them to his properties to use, and never return.

In my opinion, buying the best tool you can afford is the way to go. There is a big difference these days in crummy gardening tools, and decent, long lasting tools, and unfortunately, it can show up in price (not always, but often enough). Some people visit yard sales, barn sales, and consignment shops looking for older tools they can sharpen or repair as the quality may have been better in the past. However, if you are not mechanically inclined, do not have access (or the time) to go the secondhand route, you can still buy the basics and not break the bank.

If you are only planting earth boxes or container gardening, you really only need handtools. If you are doing ground planting, you will need larger tools. I am going to divide this list up into earth box/container gardening, and ground planting. This will get you started on a fabulous, lifelong hobby that can yield beauty and food!

Great places to purchase decent gardening tools are you local nursery, Home Depot, Lowes, your local hardware store (we have a local store called Valu that has the best gardening supplies!) and look to Amazon online. I like to look at ratings online even if I am buying in the store. The anonymity of online that can make it uncivilized at times also makes for more honest reviews. If something is 4 out of 5 stars or better, read the negative reviews first (to make sure some goofball didn’t give something a 1-star rating because UPS delivered it to the wrong house), and then make your decision.

Look for tools that absorb impact. This is where newer tools beat the old stuff with gel grips, ergonomic handles, shock absorbers (seriously), and rolling benches (save those knees) which can really help at the end of long day (or even a short day) of gardening.

You may want to consider an all-in-one kit. Sometimes, it is worth it. I have purchased several over the years because they are very cost effective. Unfortunately, I do not always use everything in a kit which seems kind of wasteful.

Whether you decide to put together gardening tools a la carte or all-in-one, these gardening tool suggestions will get you started:

Gardening Hand Tools




This includes; Trowel, Spade, Cultivator, Hand Rake, Spray Bottle, Caddy, Pruners, Weeder, Women’s Gloves (in the reviews, the gloves are either loved or hated).



If you do not need the whole kit, this threesome of: Trowel, Transplanter (Spade), & Cultivator



You need pruners to cut off stems, dead leaves, dead branches, cut flowers, etc. The directions say to care for these by: “wipe with an oily cloth after use and occasionally lubricate blades with oil suitable for carbon steel.” Or, maybe the oil sand trick will work just as well? It keeps your tools stay clean and rust free.

Larger Gardening Tools


Now, if you are gardening by planting in the ground, that requires a few more tools.

Fiskars 8.63 in. Long-Handled Digging Shovel



If you only buy one shovel, choose a Round Point Shovel with a long wood or fiberglass handle. This style is meant for digging or moving soil. Now a lot of people also buy a garden spade shovel for edging or trenching. While I have used one, I can honestly say it is nice to have, but if you are just starting your garden, get the “pointy shovel” first. You will find it more useful in the beginning.

16-Tine Double Play Bow Rake with Fiberglass Handle



You will need a rake to smooth out the soil level, remove small stones, and gather garden debris. This rake has a long padded fiberglass handle, and a dual head for use in shallow or deeper raking situations. It also comes with a 15-year warranty; it should last a long, long time.

54 in. Wood Handle Action Hoe



There are a couple of different styles of hoes that are great for gardening, and some people prefer one type of another Try a few before purchasing, because it really is a personal preference.

This is also known as a “hula hoe” in some areas. This is a wonderful tool for weeding when the weeds are small. No bending or pulling necessary – just scoot the blade across the top of the soil to cut weeds before they have a chance to grow.

A lot of people like this 2 Prong Weeder Hoe This one works well for digging seed trenches or water troughs, but equally well for weeding those larger ones you missed.

Other Garden Tools You Might Enjoy:


watering can

We have a sprinkler sysyem and it works great to water my garden plants. Before the srinkler system, I used my hose. Many people use a soaker hose. However to water my hanging baskets and containers, I have used a rain wand or a watering can. Now maybe because I am old… but I honestly prefer the watering can. Just fill it and spill it into my pots. Bam! Done!



A garden cart with wheels. Worth. Every. Penny. I have knee pads, long foam gardening pads, used a chair… forgetaboutit. Get a good cart (you can store stuff in it), sit down while weeding, and just scoot along to get to the next patch of dirt.


Storage. I have a lot of stuff for storage: plastic bins, plastic holders (for the hand held), a tool tower a storage shed (we have a bench that has morphed over to patio storage these days, but it didn’t start that way) or a garden tool rack (my favorite!)

While I have lots and lots (and lots!) of gardening tools, I truly only use the same tools over and over. This list should get you started, and keep you going strong in your garden for a long, long time.

What garden tools do you find indispensable in your garden!?


Disclosure: the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• For more Gardening posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• If you enjoyed this post, be sure to sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life weekly newsletter, and never miss another article!



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