St. Augustine Alligator Farm

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


St. Augustine Alligator Farm

Hubby and I went to the St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park a few weeks ago. This is my review of the St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park, as well as photographs and tidbits of information about the zoo.

The park opened in 1893 and moved to its current location in the 1920s. The St. Augustine Alligator Farm is open 365 days of the year, from 9-5 (summer hours 9-6).

The cost of admission for Adults (ages 12+, $22.95) and Children (ages 3-11, $11.95) as well as discounted rates for military, people in wheelchairs, resident discounts and membership pricing. Here is the pricing list.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


Hubby and I arrived at the St. Augustine Alligator Farm bright and early on a Tuesday morning… after we had gone to breakfast and dropped Max off at the groomer. Ok so it may have been closer to noon than early morning, but it was bright out! Unfortunately it wasn’t all that warm (high 50s), so we missed feeding time at the zoo.

Let me back up a bit… Hubby went to the St. Augustine Alligator Farm because I wanted to go. He was a good sport about it, and we wandered around for about 2 hours. We did not see everything, but we saw the highlights. I took over 300 photos, some of which were overexposed because I didn’t check my camera setting. Arrrrrgh

When we arrived at the St. Augustine Alligator Farm, Hubby nearly had a heart attack over the ticket price. By the time we finished with the zoo, he admitted that the price was more than fair. That is a lotta gators to feed! The clerk at admissions did ask us if we belonged to X, Y or Z to get a discount. While we do own property in St Augustine (St John’s County), we are not residents and do not have a Florida driver’s license, so do not qualify for a resident discount.

Oh well.

After we paid the admission fee our hands were stamped, and we were given a map and sent inside.

NOTE: BRING QUARTERS!! Seriously! I wish we had known to either bring quarters or to break a few dollars at the admission counter. Or, even better – I wish that there was a change machine by Alligator Swamp so we could have bought some pelts to feed the alligators. BRING QUARTERS!! and have your camera ready went you toss in those pellets!

So, let’s head in…

There is an hourly show at the St. Augustine Alligator Farm:

10 am Florida’s Forest friends (theater)
11 am Realm of the Alligator (alligator lagoon)
Noon Alligator Feeding (alligator lagoon)
1pm Scales and Tales (theater)
2pm Rainforest Review (theater)
3pm Alligator Feeding (alligator lagoon)
4pm Realm of the Alligator (alligator lagoon)
5pm Scales and Tales (theater)

We didn’t do any of that. Since there was no noon feeding, and we left before 2pm, we really didn’t have the opportunity to take in a show.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


The first resident we encountered was this beautiful toucan.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


Around the corner we saw this albino alligator. He has red eyes, and is the only alligator that can get a sunburn. His name is “Mr. Bones”. Across the way were five baby albino alligators and we lost the game of “how many baby albino alligators can you find?” because our answer was a big fat zero!

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


Next up was alligator lagoon. There were big ones to the left of us, juveniles to the right.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


St. Augustine Alligator Farm


St. Augustine Alligator Farm


I wish I had taken photos a bit faster of this guy. He was on the move, and it would have made an excellent gif!

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


Apparently this bird has a death wish.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


There were a lot of birds and turtles in with the alligators. I wish I knew why they didn’t eat them (or each other for that matter). Maybe if I had attended a theater session, I’d have found out?

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


The juveniles have no respect for personal space.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


We encountered this lady on our way to the swamp. She told us that the alligator she was holding was 5-6 years old, and his (her?) mouth was taped because the bite pressure was that of a few hundred pounds.

She told us that alligators they clamp on to their food, and they snap off pieces by breaking off pieces of their prey.

See those arrows? As we started to walk away, she unzipped her jacket to show us what she was hiding: a snake!!

We moved away fast after that.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


St. Augustine Alligator Farm


We then went over to see Maximo, and boy am I kicking myself! He showed us his pretty teeth (one was broken), his closed throat, and basically postured for 10 minutes while a group of about 10 of us stood an admired. And when I got home, I found all my photos too over exposed to post!! He truly is an enormous crocodile.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


Sydney (Maximo’s mate) was just hanging out at the bottom of the pool.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


One of their offspring scared the crud out of me when it jumped into the water in the tank across from the pool!

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


St. Augustine Alligator Farm


Next up was Gomek, and if you have the time read up on this guy. He has quite the story!

There was also a short story about how Gomek came to be at the St. Augustine Alligator Farm, his The Guinness World Record, and more. It was extremely interesting, so if you do go to the Alligator Farm, stop and watch the presentation.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


When we exited Gomek’s exhibit, we were on the boardwalk trail through the alligator swap.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


It is now time to pull out the quarters and the camera!

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


The alligators know by the sound of feet near the feed pelt machines that someone might be tossing in food, so they gather in clumps. This was really cool! The water seemed rather shallow, so you got a great look at all the alligators in the water.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


St. Augustine Alligator Farm


And on land!

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


This is a mean Australian bird whose name I forgot.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


The birds of Africa had some cool birds in it…

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


St. Augustine Alligator Farm


St. Augustine Alligator Farm


Including this beautiful macaw. There are 16 species of macaw.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


Apparently, you can have your picture taken with the turtles! I have no idea what that is about. I’d contact St. Augustine Alligator Farm for details if you are interested.

St. Augustine Alligator Farm


St. Augustine Alligator Farm


St. Augustine Alligator Farm


St. Augustine Alligator Farm


The has all 23 species of crocodilians and is the only place you can see every species of alligator, crocodile, caiman, and gharial in one spot. The photos I am sharing are just a small sampling of all that is being offered in this one acre zoo. They really pack a lot in to this St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park. It may have taken me three year to get here, but better late than never! It really is worth the price of admission (and extra quarters). Definitely go if you are in the St Augustine area.


• For more Florida posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• For more Travel posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• If you enjoyed this post, be sure to sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life weekly newsletter, and never miss another article!



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life

Comments

  1. Loved seeing those pictures, Ann. I grew up less than a mile from the Alligator Farm and we could hear those peacocks screeching from our house. If you want to take a short drive day trip near Gainesville, you can walk out on Paynes Prairie and see wild horses, buffalo, and tons of alligators laying out in the open by the swamp. Then you could drive over to Lake Alice on UF campus and see more alligators in the open as well. Across the street from Lake Alice is the bat house, and at dusk, there are hundreds of thousands of bats that exit the house – what a sight!!! flmnh.ufl.edu/index.php/bats/home/

    • I will definitely talk to Hubby about Paynes Prairie, Gail. Since they allow leashed pets, that is something we could definitely do with Max. Thanks!

      Ann

Speak Your Mind

*

Return to top of page