Do Your Kids Do Chores?

Do Your Kids Do Chores?


Do your kids do chores? Or are you one of those that finds it “easier” to do everything around the house yourself?

When I was a kid growing up in the 60s and 70s, my mother was a firm believer that child labor laws were more of a guideline than a rule. In her belief system, my brother, sister and I were not put upon this earth to be waited on, but rather to earn our keep. By age 8 I was doing: dishes, cleaning bathrooms, the laundry dusting, vacuuming, and just about every other household task there was. I didn’t cook much because my sister was a better cook. If my mother didn’t make up a dish that morning to be popped into the oven when she left for work (she went to work at 4pm until I was about 12), my sister was responsible for making dinner.

My brother is three years younger than I am, but as soon as he was big enough to push the mower (he was such a little peanut! He went into the Marines at age 19 weighing 140 pounds, and gained 25 pounds during basic training!) yard work was his game. When my father could catch him that is. That kid was fast, and it was my father’s responsibility to grab him and make him do his chores.

Needless to say, the division of labor in my parent’s household was divided: my mother trained the girls, my father the boy(s). The (s) is because by the time my youngest brother was born, a lot changed in that household. We were all significantly older, and did the chores so he didn’t have too. I am sure it helped that my youngest brother was not only very good natured, but the single most beautiful baby you ever saw! He had us all wrapped around his little finger without even trying. Strangely the lack of chore-training didn’t really hurt him as he is very handy, and apparently naturally inclined to neatness. He learned all, except laundry (by that time my mother had machines she wanted no one else touching), after we left home, just in a less drill-Sargent-y environment.

When I had Sonny-boy, I knew I didn’t want to make him a slave to chores, but I did want him to learn how to do the basics – for his own good. He learned to do dishes, resisted learning how to do laundry (and was sorry when he went off to college and had a few disasters!), clean his room, etc. He doesn’t believe in making his bed, but whatever.

From an early age Sonny-boy instinctively knew how to cook. I may have taught him the basics, but he surpassed me long ago in creativity and willingness to try new things.

Would it have been “easier” for me to have done everything myself instead of insisting Sonny-boy learn out how to cook and clean? In our three person household, the answer is an unequivocal yes. There wasn’t that much of a mess. Sonny-boy seldom made a mess because I swear he was just too lazy to clean up after himself. I always suspected he just found it easier to not cause clutter and chaos than be responsible for picking up after himself later. In my parent’s household where there were five or six people to contend with, I think my mother would have worn herself out if she had taken the “easy” path and not used child labor.

Do your kids do chores? Or do you (or your significant other) do all the clean up? Or are you fortunate enough to have a live in maid?


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How To Render Fat To Make Lard

How To Render Fat To Make Lard. Ever wondered how to render fat to make lard? Hubby renders the fat every time we purchase a pig. We use some of the lard and he gives away some of the lard.  It is beautifully white, and really makes  a very nice pastry crust. Learn how to render fat to make lard with these step by step instructions.




Ever wondered how to render fat to make lard? Hubby renders the fat every time we purchase a pig. We use some of the lard and he gives away some of the lard. It is beautifully white, and really makes a very nice pastry crust. Learn how to render fat to make lard with these step by step instructions.

How To Render Fat To Make Lard. Ever wondered how to render fat to make lard? Hubby renders the fat every time we purchase a pig. We use some of the lard and he gives away some of the lard.  It is beautifully white, and really makes  a very nice pastry crust. Learn how to render fat to make lard with these step by step instructions.


If you are rendering fat, you may also be interested in these other posts:
How To Smoke A Ham
How To Cure and Smoke Your Own Bacon

How To Render Fat To Make Lard


• This is the fat from the pig we purchased. Hubby makes lard with every pig we purchase – and we purchase yearly. Here are my tips for buying a cow, pig, goat, etc straight from the farmer.

How To Render Fat To Make Lard


• You will need a pot or Dutch oven.
• Pre-heat oven to 250º regular oven 225º convection oven.

How To Render Fat To Make Lard


• Place 5+ pounds of ground pig fat into a covered oven-safe dutch oven.
• Bake at 250º regular oven 225º convection oven, stirring occasionally for about an hour or so. Most of the solid should have turned to liquid by then. Be careful that the ground fat doesn’t turn brown in color.
• Ladle out the liquid and strain through coffee filters layered in a metal strainer.
• Put any strained solids back into the dutch oven.

How To Render Fat To Make Lard


• Let the lard cool to about 100 degrees, and portion them into plastic soup containers or silicone bakeware.

How To Render Fat To Make Lard


• Put in freezer until completely cool and solidified.
• Leave headspace, as the lard will expand in volume as it cools.

How To Render Fat To Make Lard


• Turn out onto a cutting board and slice into usable pieces.

How To Render Fat To Make Lard


• Wrap for freezing.
• This is Freeze-tite so when foodsavered and frozen, one piece can be removed from the pack and the pack can just be re-sealed.

How To Render Fat To Make Lard


• This is what I call “white lard” and is good for baking.
Foodsaver for freezing.

• For the remaining ground pig fat in the pot, turn up the heat to 325/350 degrees, and stir more frequently than before. Eventually, the ground pig fat will release all of its liquid lard, and the remaining solids will sink to the bottom of the pot. These solids are called chicharrones in Spanish (or cracklins down south).

• Take the cracklins and spread them out in a baking pan and bake them for another 10 to 15 minutes to make sure they get crispy. Use these like bacon bits. Keep them refrigerated or frozen. Microwave them for 30 seconds to crisp them up (cover them in case they splatter).

• Pour everything into a coffee filter strainer. The liquid will be a light amber color. This is what I call “dark lard”. It will have a roasted pork flavor to it, so it should only be used for savory dishes, not baking.


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Laugh For Today

Thank you to Dian for today’s Laugh For Today

Laugh For Today, joke of the day



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