How To Make Colored Sugar

How To Make Colored Sugar. An inexpensive, and easy to make, cookie decoration is colored sugar. This is an easy tutorial on how to make colored sugar!


How To Make Colored Sugar

How To Make Colored Sugar. Step by step instructions on how to make your own colored sugar to decorate cupcakes, cakes and cookies.



How To Make Colored Sugar. An inexpensive, and easy to make, cookie decoration is colored sugar. This is an easy tutorial on how to make colored sugar!


Decorations are used in some of the 15 Days of Holiday Cookies recipes I am posting next month. An inexpensive, and easy to make, cookie decoration is colored sugar. This is an easy tutorial on how to make colored sugar!

How To Make Colored Sugar


You will need:

• Dishes (bowls work well)
• Food Coloring
• Jelly Roll Pans (or another pan with sides)
• Measuring Cup
• Spoons
• Strainer(s)
• Sugar
• Wax Paper

How To Make Colored Sugar


Put a strainer over a bowl.
Place 1/4 cup of sugar into the strainer.
Add 6-12 drops of food coloring to the sugar. The more you add, the richer and darker your color.
Scrape the food color into the sugar with a spoon. It will accumulate in the bowl beneath strainer.

How To Make Colored Sugar


Set up a second bowl. Place the strainer over the second bowl.
Now take the sugar you just strained in the first bowl, and pour it into the strainer again.
Again scrape the color into the sugar.
You are going to do this over and over until the sugar is completely colored.

Tip: Always work with dry utensils and strainers. Change your strainer out for each color. Do not reuse your blue strainer for yellow coloring without washing it first, otherwise your yellow will have a blue tinge, or possibly green!

How To Make Colored Sugar


The colored sugar is damp. It needs to be dried out.
Spread the colored sugar over a wax paper lined jelly roll pan.
Allow to dry.

How To Make Colored Sugar


You are going to have to give the colored sugar a stir a time or two to turn the sugar allowing it to dry, and squash to any lumps.

How To Make Colored Sugar. An inexpensive, and easy to make, cookie decoration is colored sugar. This is an easy tutorial on how to make colored sugar!


You can use the color chart on the back of the food coloring box to make colors other than the basic 4 coloring inside the box.
Allow to dry completely before you use your colored sugar!


• For more Recipes on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• If you enjoyed this post, be sure to sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life weekly newsletter, and never miss another article!



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life

How To Cut Open An Acorn Squash

How To Cut Open An Acorn Squash


How To (Easily) Cut Open An Acorn Squash; A simple, ingenious way to easily cut open your acorn squash without using upper body strength! Perfect every time.



I am sure there are many ways to cut open a squash, but hubby figured out this ingenious way for me to do it that does not require a lot of upper body strength – something I have never had in spades.

How To Cut Open An Acorn Squash

How To Cut Open An Acorn Squash


You will need a cutting board, a large non-serrated knife and a rubber mallet. We have a dedicated rubber mallet just for food, and we keep in one of our kitchen drawers.

How To Cut Open An Acorn Squash


Place the knife into one of the dents in the middle of the acorn squash, and push a little bit to get started. When you can’t easily apply more pressure, get out your mallet and give the top if the knife blade a whack. When the blade is in the squash far enough that you can’t hit it any more, hit the exposed handle. The knife will easily cut through the rest of the squash.

If you are working with a butternut squash that doesn’t have dents, eyeball the middle of the squash and inert the tip of the knife into the squash, applying pressure downward and back on your knife. This will insert the knife in a straight line down the length of the squash. The only difference between a squash with the indentations and without, is you don’t have a natural guide. The pressure is the same.

How To Cut Open An Acorn Squash


This will cleave cleanly. Scoop out the seeds and discard (or save to roast).

When you cook your squash there are no “right” ingredients. Some people cook them without any sugar or butter (those people are odd ducks in my opinion), many people, myself included, like a sweet topping. Basically you can use anything sweet from sugar to honey to maple syrup. If you use maple syrup or honey, you really don’t need to add butter but you can – it is all to taste.

How To Cut Open An Acorn Squash


For myself, I love to load up my acorn squash. This is two pats of butter (which will be overkill for most people, one is plenty) and a heaping tablespoon of brown sugar. The problem with this is it is too much liquid on the cooked acorn for most people when the squash is cooked, and you can burn yourself if you try and eat the finished product too quickly. Me? I like to live on the edge.

How To Cut Open An Acorn Squash


Cook your acorn squash on a foil lined pan for easy clean-up. The temperature is 350º, and I bake for 45 minutes. If you want the sugar to seep into your squash, give the vegetable a slash or two before cooking. Not too deep though as you don’t want your sweet liquid to run all over you pan, you want it cooked into your squash!

How do you cook your squash? Sweet, straight up or some other way?


• For a list of all recipes available on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

This recipe originally appeared on Coupons, Deals and More many moons ago! I recovered a lot of lost recipes from my old blog, and this is one of them.



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life

How To Freeze Blueberries

How To Freeze Blueberries. Whether store bought or picked fresh in your backyard, summer blueberries are a great source of antioxidants! To preserve these delicious berries for use when they are not in season,  follow  these easy How To Freeze Blueberries instructions!




How To Freeze Blueberries

Whether store bought or picked fresh in your backyard, summer blueberries are a great source of antioxidants! To preserve these delicious berries for use when they are not in season, follow these easy How To Freeze Blueberries instructions!

How To Freeze Blueberries. Whether store bought or picked fresh in your backyard, summer blueberries are a great source of antioxidants! To preserve these delicious berries for use when they are not in season,  follow  these easy How To Freeze Blueberries instructions!


The blueberries I froze in this tutorial were purchased in the grocery store. It honestly does not matter where you buy them – store, farmstand, or if you grow them yourself. Freezing blueberries is simple. So next time there is a great blueberry sale at your local grocer, or if you have an abundant harvest, simply follow the steps below to extend your blueberry bounty for later use.

How To Freeze Blueberries


How To Freeze Blueberries


Wash your blueberries thoroughly in a colander, drain completely and remove any leaves or twigs.

How To Freeze Blueberries


Layer cookie sheets with dish towels or paper towels to remove excess water. Place blueberries on a single layer on top of the towels. When the blueberries are dried, remove the paper or dish towels.

How To Freeze Blueberries


Place single layered blueberry trays in the freezer. Allow to freeze overnight.

How To Freeze Blueberries


The next day, remove the frozen blueberries from the tray. Gently place the frozen blueberries in a ziploc or vacuum sealing bags, again in a single layer.

How To Freeze Blueberries


Vacuum seal your frozen blueberries. Label accurately!

Now you are ready to enjoy summer blueberries throughout the year!


Disclosure the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• For more Recipes on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• If you enjoyed this post, be sure to sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life weekly newsletter, and never miss another article!



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life
Return to top of page