Flat Pierogi Dough Recipe

Flat Pierogi Dough Recipe


While most people are familiar with filled Pierogi, my family enjoys an extra sweet Pierogi dough which we use to make un-filled, flat Pierogi. We cook them in butter and brown sugar, and they are simply delicious! Here is the recipe we use:

Flat Pieogi Dough Recipe

Dough Ingredients

3 cups Sifted, Unbleached Cake Flour
1/4 tsp salt
3/4 cup Boiling Water
1/4 Cup Milk w/1 TBSP Sugar (stir to dissolve sugar)
1/2 tsp Cooking Oil

Water

6 Quarts Boiling Water
1 tsp Cooking Oil

• Combine sifted cake flour and salt in a large bowl
• Pour 3/4 cups boiling water to flour, stir with fork. Any lumps should be crumbled with the fork
• Cover bowl with cotton dishtowel and set aside for 5 minutes
• Add 1/4 cup of milk w/sugar, again mash the flour with a fork
• Cover bowl with cotton dishtowel, set aside for 15 minutes
• Add 1/2 tsp Cooking Oil, knead dough until smooth (approximately 5 minutes)

• Bring water to a rapid, rolling boil on the stove. Add cooking oil. (Note: you can run 2-3 pots at a time to speed up the process)

Flat Pierogi Dough Recipe


• Roll dough until flat. Hubby came up with this idea a few years ago to put the dough through a pasta maker. I was skeptical at first, but I must say it makes the process go a lot faster!! We roll on a 2 first.
• Rerolled on a 3.5
• The final roll was a 5.
• Cut into squares, rectangles, etc. Size does not matter. I usually mix it up with small and large pieces so people can choose.

Flat Pierogi Dough Recipe


• Add uncooked dough to the boiling water
• Cook at least 3 minutes. With a filled pierogi you can tell the dough is cooked when it floats to the top. Since these are unfilled, they float almost immediately. Cook them for 3 minutes to ensure they have been boiled.
• Use a slotted spoon to remove the dough from the boiling water.
• Place on rack to dry

• Once you have boiled your dough, the pierogi are technically cooked, and may be frozen or served. I cannot image eating them that way though. The traditional preparation for a sweet pierogi is butter and sugar. We treat the flats as sweet dough in our house, and prepare in a pan on the stove with butter and brown sugar. Be very careful though as this is basically candy and you can burn yourself if you get the brown sugar and butter mixture on your skin.

Flat Pierogi Dough Recipe


• Serve hot and enjoy!


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Hubby’s Waring Immersion Blender

Hubby has long wanted me to write a post about the wonders of his immersion blender. Hmmmm let me back up a bit… in the Ann’s Entitled Life household, Hubby has done the vast majority of cooking since we got married. Hubby is an excellent cook. Part of his undergraduate curricula included cooking, and he has always had an interest in good food and cooking. Since he was in his mid-30s when we got married, he had to cook for himself a lot of years, either that, or go out to dinner.

I am a very plain cook. No sauces, few herbs and spices – I like to think of it as allowing the natural flavors of the food to come out.

Hubby very much like sauces, herbs and spices, and he is happy to experiment with his cooking.

I tolerate all of this, and even clean up after his (atrocious) kitchen messes because – hey, I don’t have to cook!

Hubby is also a gadget guy. If there is a gadget for a job, he buys it, and uses it. I think kitchen knives are multi-tools; he has a heart attack if I scoop ice cream with a teaspoon instead of an ice cream scoop. Sometimes, to get a rise out of him, I purposely misuse a tool or kitchen utensil to watch him gasp in horror. You never saw my Hubby move so fast as when he is aghast at how I am mis-using a tool, and wants to “teach” me the proper way to use it. Usually I am laughing so hard by the time he gets to me that even if I really didn’t know how to use said tool (99.99% of the time I do), he wouldn’t be able to capture my attention to teach me a thing.

It’s the little things that make for a great marriage! 😀

Hubby has over the years accumulated some really interesting and unique kitchen and power tools. And sometimes a kitchen power tool. Like today’s Waring Immersion Blender I want to tell you about that he uses to mix and puree soups ans sauces in a giant pot. Hubby frequently makes double batches of soup so he can share with my grandfather.

This is the immersion blender Hubby has (the 12″ size): Waring Commercial Big Stix Immersion Blender An immersion blender (or stick blender) will blend ingredients or puree food in the pot or pan in which they are being prepared.

YAY! I swear there is a youtube video for everything. Hubby’s Waring Immersion Blender is a 3 speed, 12″ stick that easily comes apart and clicks together. Clean up is simple. Truly simple. He ended up with the Waring Commercial Big Stix Immersion Blender after a lot of research. He had burned out a few home-use-immersion sticks (in the $75 range), and decided to just bite the bullet and get a commercial grade immersion blender that would last forever.

I will say that he uses this very frequently. Several times a month at least!

Waring Immersion Blender


In action!

Waring Immersion Blender


The Waring Immersion Blender easily comes apart to clean the wand. This also makes for easy storage.

Hubby can control how smooth or chunky he wants his soups. He can also control the speed – the 3-speed function really is nice.

If you like gadgets or make a lot of soups, the Waring Commercial Big Stix Immersion Blender may be for you too!

(Believe it or not, this was not an infomercial, and sadly, Waring didn’t send us a thing.)

Do you have an immersion blender? If so, what do you have? How do you like it?

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Pork Sausage Casserole


Pork Sausage Casserole

An easy to make, simply outstanding, pork sausage casserole recipe. Great for breakfast, or as a dinner entree or side dish, this one your whole family will love!

Prep Time:25 minutes
Cook time:45 minutes

Ingredients:
4.5oz Wild Rice, prepared 1 4.5oz Carolina Long Grain and Wild Rice packet, prepared according to package directions was used to make the dish shown
1 lb Pork Sausage
1 cup fresh Mushrooms
1 Onion, chopped
4 TBSP Wondra
½ cup Heavy Cream
1/8 tsp Thyme
¼ tsp Oregano
½ cup Slivered Almonds
1 (15oz) can Chicken Broth

Directions:


• Preheat oven to 350°.
• Prepare wild rice according to manufacturer instructions.
• In a pan, crumble, then fry, pork sausage, drain fat.
• In same pan, saute onions and mushrooms.
• Mix in Wondra, then stir in heavy cream until smooth.
• Add thyme, oregano, slivered almonds, simmer 5 minutes.
• Transfer all to a 4 qt casserole dish.
• Add cooked rice and chicken broth.
• Bake at 350° for 45 minutes.

Makes 6 servings of Pork Sausage Casserole

Pork Sausage Casserole. An easy to make, simply outstanding, pork sausage casserole recipe. Great for breakfast, or as a dinner entree or side dish, this one your whole family will love!



This is one easy to make casserole. You can serve it for breakfast, brunch or as a dinner entree or side dish! It is truly easy to make.

The Carolina wild rice package is the exact size for this dish making it convenient, but you can use 4.5 ounces of any wild rice (dry weight). Just prepare it before adding to the dish before baking.

Honest to Pete, if you like pork sausage, you are going to love what this easy recipe does to enhance it. You will want to lick the plate (not kidding!)

Note – I originally published this on my old blog back in 2010. The photos have been updated.

• To print the recipe, click here.


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