Bathroom Vanity Makeover

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Bathroom Vanity Makeover

The step by step process of updating our bathroom vanity built-ins in our Florida condo.

Hubby and I had talked a lot about ripping out the vanities, countertops, etc in our Florida condo. They were in rough shape, and original to the condo. But, we started talking about how long we plan on owning the unit, if we’d ever get the money back on those upgrades, and whether or not we wanted to go through the brain damage of ripping out and replacing the units.

In the end, we decided that, for now, it wasn’t something we wanted to go forward with as a large project.

We did however, want to do something about the cabinets, faucets, and mirrors in the unit. We plan on upgrading the faucets, and framing the frameless mirrors. Hubby also wants to update the light fixers. I actually like them. They are the open bulb bathroom light units that look like this, but they give off gobs of light! Still, I am not opposed to an upgrade.

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


The cabinets looked beat. While I am usually opposed to painting wood (I’ve stripped enough wood furniture and molding in my time), that seemed the only solution for these boxes.

We looked to the Rust-Oleum Cabinet Transformations but after reading the reviews, and looking at the ingredients, and lack of color choices, we decided to go it on our own.

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Hubby had used Insl-X Stix on some very tough jobs, and felt it was the product to use for our primer. So off we went to the local Benjamin Moore dealer to pick up a gallon.

While there, we also picked up a gallon of Cabinet Coat paint that we had tinted Hawaiian Breeze. Eight years ago we had the kitchen cabinets at our house in New York State painted with Cabinet Coat, and they still look great today! We decided to go with a paint we had used and trusted.

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Hubby removed the doors from the cabinets, and the removable drawers too. After he took the hinges off, I cleaned the hinges well using this method. I TSP-ed the cabinetry to clean it before sanding. I was a bit nervous about this as I was worried that some of the finish had come off leaving bare wood, but in the end it was not an issue.

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Once the hinges were removed, the doors were marked with a placement number. This was so we knew exactly where they came off the built-in, and could return them to the proper opening.

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Hubby then covered the number with a piece of paint tape. This was painted over during painting.

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


The piece of table was removed after the painting was completed. He then reattached the hinges, and rehung the door in the proper space. The hinge completely covers the small unpainted portion where the number was.

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Bathroom Vanity Makeover


He taped off the edges of the built in cabinets, the floor, the upper part where the cabinets meet countertop, as well as the inside of the cabinet as we were not painted that.

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Since we are in a condo, space is tight. Hubby set up in the guest bedroom. We covered all the furniture with drop cloths, as well as the floor. Hubby also cut up some large cardboard boxes to put on top of the plastic drop cloth on the floor so it would not move with our feet. We then used an old door as the paint shelf, laying it across two saw horses.

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Hubby just loves that $3 Shur-Line Paint Can Lid and Spout he recommends in his 10 Easy Paint Tips.

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


The cabinetry was given a light sanding before any painting started to smooth out any edges (surprisingly few!), and prep the wood for primer.

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


It was also lightly sanded between the primer and color coat (ok so I was a tad late with this photo).

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Hubby gave the cabinet a coat of primer, and both sides of the doors and drawers.

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


He waited a complete day to put on the first color coat over the primer. It wasn’t due to necessity on the part of the primer, but rather because we had stuff to do.

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Hubby used two coats of paint color. He waited until each side was dry before turning. I was the eyes looking for drips and splotches. The Cabinet Coat is self-leveling, so the few bubbles evened out, but nothing will even-out a huge drip!

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


Once he was finished, he reattached the hinges and added plastic bumpers.

Bathroom Vanity Makeover


This is the finished product! Unfortunately, the photo does not do the job justice. It is a dark room with no natural light. It does look wonderful in person! The second bathroom received the same color, and it too looks beautiful.

While we purchased a gallon of paint (having two bathrooms and another project in the same color), you really only need a quart of each to do a bathroom vanity. A little goes a long way with both the Insl-X Stix and the Cabinet Coat.

The entire project took Hubby five days as …. we had other stuff to do. If you wanted to do the same project and just allowed for time in between coats to dry, this could definitely be done in a weekend.


• For more Renovation posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

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Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics

Everything you need to set up or complete your home bar (besides the liquor!)

Setting up a bar at home or just looking for frequently used bar accessories used in making cocktail recipes? Bar accessories can be fun, playful or just utilitarian in nature. Some items are used frequently, some are more for party or large gathering use. A bar set up can make a great shower or wedding gift, or maybe you just need to fill in a few blanks? Here are my recommendations for setting up a home bar. Except for the fruit, all these items are shelf stable and do not need to be kept cold (and that is why I didn’t include eggs or ice).

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Cocktail Shaker – when you need your cocktails shaken, not stirred. A cocktail shaker makes for perfect combination of ingredients, and no drips.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Bar Rags – (or bar mops, basically kitchen dish towels) Lint free so you don’t leave flecks on your clean glasses

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Bar Spoon- used to stir a drink.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Blender- a necessity for mixing up icy drinks such as a Piña Colada or a Daiquiri.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Bottle Opener – pretty self-explanatory, necessary for opening bottles of beer or pop.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Citrus Squeezer – the difference between a good drink and a great drink can be as simple as freshly squeezed juice. I use mine all the time with lemons and limes.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Cocktail Glasses – there are many, many bar glasses you can purchase in all price ranges from a dollar for a plastic cocktail glass, to thousands for a collection of Waterford crystal. If you are just starting out building you bar, this party pack has the basics (I use it to photograph some of the drink recipes on Ann’s Entitled Life) or perhaps this entertainment pack better suits your needs?

Here’s a list of basic bar glasses, and their uses:

Champagne Flute: Champagne
Collins Glass: large mixed drinks
Irish Coffee Mug: hot alcoholic beverages
Hurricane: mixed drinks such as the hurricane, ruby relaxer, daiquiri and more!
Margarita Glass: margaritas
Martini (cocktail) Glass: martini, Manhattans, metropolitan, margaritas, grasshoppers, gimlets and more
Old Fashioned (tumbler): mixed drinks
Pilsner Glass: beer
Shot Glass: shots of alcohol
Snifter: brandy, cognac
Wine Glass: red and white wine glasses used for wine

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Cocktail Muddler – you muddle stuff… basically you use a muddler to squish fruits, leaves (like mint or basil), sugars in a cocktail. My Raspberry Mint Julep Recipe has muddled raspberries and mint.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Cocktail Napkins – cocktail napkins soak up the glass sweat from melting ice so you avoid water rings on the bar or table, and they are fun!

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Jigger – measure exact quantities with a cocktail jigger. Cocktails call for 1/2 or 1 oz increments for a single drink. A jigger – specifically a double jigger – one side is 1/2 ounce, the other side is 1 ounce – is the easiest way to get uniform half and full ounce portions.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Ice Bucket – I only use my ice bucket for parties, but it is a definite necessity (with ice tongs) then!

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Knife – you’ll need it to cut your fruit (and a cutting board would not be remiss – put that last part in for Hubby. He had heart failure when I cut directly on the counter.)

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Olive Picks (stainless steel, plastic, wood, disposable) – great for placing olives, onions, maraschino cherries on a stick in a drink. When you look for the plastic ones, they are often labeled swords or picks.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Pitcher – for making more than one drink! I use mine to mix up some Tropical Rum Punch, Sidecars and more. A stirrer is a must.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Recipe Book – I love this book! If you have Amazon Prime you can download it for free. I felt it was worth the $2.99, and it is part of my eBook collection!

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Strainer – to strain your drinks from the cocktail shaker to glass.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Swizzle Sticks (plastic, glass, disposable) I have a giant collection to finish off a tall, stirred cocktail.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Wine Opener – Hubby bought me an electric wine opener, and I must admit I seldom use it. I prefer the old corkscrew.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Bitters – a shelf stable cocktail flavoring that basically will last f-o-r-e-v-e-r.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Citrus Fruit – lemons, limes, oranges, not just for garnish but for the juice to mix the drinks

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Cream of Coconut – used in a lot of tropical drinks such as the Blue Hawaiian and Piña Colada.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Decorator Sugar – used in rimming a cocktail glass.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Gernadine – used in Bahama Mama, the Pink Lady and Pink Shimmy, as well as many other cocktails.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Ginger Beer – basically a fermented beverage used as a mixer, it is usually non-alcoholic (less than 0.5%) these days, although there is a brand or two out there that does contain alcohol. There is a difference in taste, and I prefer the non-alcoholic type.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Maraschino Cherries – used for garnish, and the juice is used in many cocktails.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Margarita Salt – used in rimming a cocktail glass.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Olives – another garnish, although the juice is also used to make a dirty martini.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Pop – ginger ale, cola, 7-up – used as a mixer in many cocktails

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Seltzer Water – a cocktail mixer

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Simple Syrup (or sometimes rock syrup) which is sugar water. Frequently used as the wet for rimming, or as an ingredient to sweeten the drink.

Ultimate Guide to Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics


Tonic Water

Those are my Non-Alcoholic Bar Basics To Setup a Home Bar Essentials. What else do you consider a Non-Alcoholic Bar Basic?


As always, drink responsibly and please don’t drink and drive.

Disclosure this post may contain affiliate links.

• For more household tips on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• For more liquor and wine cocktail recipes, tips and reviews, click here.

• Be sure to follow my Cocktails board on Pinterest!


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