Essential Oils to Use in Your Baking

Essential Oils to Use in Your Baking; add these popular essential oils to your kitchen cabinets so they are easily accessible for you to add to your baking recipes.


Essential Oils to Use in Your Baking

Add these popular essential oils to your kitchen cabinets so they are easily accessible for you to add to your baking recipes.



Essential oils are useful for so many things, cooking and baking included. There are several oil choices that work wonders to enhance the cakes, muffins and cookies that you love to bake, and even more that you can use to sneak into the favorite treats of family members for their health benefits. If you love baking and are interested in adding popular essential oils to your recipes for an enhanced flavor get ready to experiment with some of your favorite oils.

Lavender Essential Oil

Lavender essential oil, added in very small doses makes a great addition to cookies, cakes and puddings. Lavender Essential Oil goes best with very light or buttery baked goods so consider adding Lavender Essential Oil to treats like shortbread, lemon cake and sponge cakes. Many recipes that already call for lavender buds to be used in the mix can be replaced with the essential oil, but you do not need the large amount that you’d add for dried florals.

Peppermint Essential Oil

If you love making cakes and treats that use mint flavored icings and creme, then Peppermint Essential Oil is going to be a favorite essential oil. Even used in cookies, ice cream, scones, along with other flavors, this oil gives everything a cool, minty taste. Pair this Peppermint Essential Oil with chocolate and strawberry based desserts for the best results, and you only need one or two drops to flavor an entire cake or batch of icing.

Orange Essential Oil

If you are a fan of citrus, and treats that feature orange blossom, then Orange Essential Oil is going to tickle your taste buds. Orange Essential Oil is a bright, tangy oil that can be used in addition with other herbs to flavor muffins, cakes, cookies and just about every type of baking good. This flavor of Orange Essential Oil is not as strong as other essential oils so you want to taste test the batter with each drop. Usually two to three drops of Orange Essential Oil for a cake or batch of muffins is more than enough.

Rose Essential Oil

Rose is such a light and exotic flavor; most people do not realize it cannot be used in their baking goods. Rose Essential Oil is light, slightly floral and flavorful so Rose Essential Oil makes a great top flavor for something that is stronger food taste. Rose Essential Oil is great mixed into frosting, icing, or as a filling in rich cakes. If the filling is strong, a cake flavored with rose essential oil will turn pair nicely because it is so light and fresh.

Note: Essential oils are very strong and even non-toxic essential oils may be irritating if not used carefully and sparingly. Do not overuse an essential oil in your food or drink. I purposely linked to essential oils that are listed as “food grade” on the company’s website. Make sure whatever essential oils you use in food are fit for consumption.

Please remember that none of this is meant as medical advice. I am not a doctor, and do not play one on the internet. Please consult a physician if you have any questions about using essential oils so your doctor can better explain to you the benefits, possible side effects, and any warnings about essential oils.


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Mac vs PC

Mac vs PC; The MAC versus PC debate. Anyone want to weigh in?


The MAC versus PC debate. Anyone want to weigh in?

The laptop I use daily is fairly old for a PC. I have kept it alive with twine and glue because I didn’t want to be subjected to Windows 8 (I have windows 7 professional as my operating system). I wanted to see what windows 10 was all about as Microsoft has a habit of releasing good/bag operating systems regularly: good/bad/good/bad/good/bad. Since windows 7 was a good, and windows 8 was a bad, I had high hopes that windows 10 would follow the pattern and be a good.

Welp, the reviews are in on windows 10, and people are pretty happy (except for the occasional blue “Something Happened” screen). Of course those people happiest are those that upgraded the second windows 10 was released to escape the pain that was windows 8.

Their opinions are suspect.

I have been toying with buying a Mac. I have an ipad retina, and love it. I used it for all things internet when we traveled through Europe, and it met those needs well. Of course I didn’t actually blog or do graphics or manipulate photos with it, but I was about to use it to peruse the internet, check email, get on social media, etc., etc.

What is stopping me from running out yesterday and buying a mac are a few thing. The the laptop size of a Mac retina: maximum 15 inches. My current laptop is 17″. Now I can make the determination on size at my local apple store. The trade-off of size versus a retina screen may well be worth those two inches. I will make the trek to the apple store to see.

I also am concerned about transitioning. I understand Parallels allows me to use PC programs on Mac. Will it allow me to get my content over to the Mac too?

So for those of you that had a PC and now have a Mac can you tell me: How hard was it to adjust to a MAC after moving on from a PC? How difficult was it to get your PC content over to your Mac? Any tips or insight you would like to share from this move? Do you regret moving to a Mac?

Thanks for any input!!


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Chocolate Banana Cake Recipe


Chocolate Banana Cake Recipe

Moist, tempting and delicious, this intense, fudgy Chocolate Banana Cake Recipe is fabulous with ice cream after dinner, or with milk for breakfast!

Prep Time:15 minutes
Cook time:30 minutes

Ingredients:

1 ¼ cup Flour
¼ cup + 2 TBSP Unsweetened Cocoa
¼ cup Brown Sugar
1 tsp Baking Soda
¼ tsp Salt
3 ripe Bananas (approximately 3.5 cups)
½ cup Coconut Oil, melted
1 tsp Vanilla Extract
1 cup Semi-sweet Chocolate Chips, divided

Directions:

• Preheat oven to 350°
• Spray a 1.5-quart baking dish with non-stick cooking spray and set aside.
• In a large bowl, mix the flour, cocoa, brown sugar, baking soda and salt until well combined.
• In a separate large bowl, whisk together the mashed bananas, vanilla and coconut oil until smooth.
• Add the dry ingredients to the wet and mix until just combined.
• Add the chocolate chips and stir until just combined, reserving a few chocolate chips to sprinkle on the top of the cake.
• Pour the batter into your prepared dish and sprinkle with the reserved chocolate chips.
• Bake for 30-35 minutes at 350° or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

Makes 12 servings Chocolate Banana Cake

Chocolate Banana Cake; moist, tempting and delicious, this intense, fudgy Chocolate Banana Cake Recipe is fabulous with ice cream after dinner, or with milk for breakfast!




• To print the Chocolate Banana Cake recipe click here.

Chocolate Banana Cake; moist, tempting and delicious, this intense, fudgy Chocolate Banana Cake Recipe is fabulous with ice cream after dinner, or with milk for breakfast!


Note:

• It’s important to use bananas that are very ripe. Not only do ripe bananas add most of the sweetness in this recipe, but they also help keep it very moist.
• If you don’t have Coconut Oil you can substitute vegetable oil.
• If you prefer your desserts to be extra sweet, you can add 1/4 cup white sugar to the dry ingredients.
• This has a very intense chocolate flavor. If you prefer a milder flavor, you can decrease the amount of cocoa and use milk chocolate chips instead of semi-sweet.


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