10 Easy to Grow Herbs

10 Easy to Grow Herbs. If you are a beginner gardener and would like to start growing herbs, this list of easy to grow herbs will help you decide what to cultivate.


If you are a beginner gardener and would like to start growing herbs, this list of easy to grow herbs will help you decide what to cultivate.

If you like to cook even a little bit, at some point you start thinking about growing your own fresh herbs. The cooks on TV always use them and rave about the difference in flavor over those jars of dried ones. It is much easier than you thought to grow your own herbs! Here is a collection of some of the easiest to grow in your garden.

10 Easy to Grow Herbs

First a word about growing herbs – for the most part, they do not require much care. If you grow them in a sunny spot, water when dry, and harvest no more than one-third of the plant at any one time, your herbs should reward you with abundance.

basil growing in the ground


Basil
• This is very easy to grow. If you like pesto, grow this one! Start from seeds several times during the spring/summer season to keep your supply coming in as long as possible.
• Keep flower heads pinched off to promote leaf growth, and remove top buds to make plants bushier (do not allow the plant to bolt).
Annual – you will need to replant every year.
Hardiness zones 1-10
Here are some simple instructions on How to Harvest and Grow Basil.

Chamomile growing in the ground


Chamomile, Roman
• Deliciously fragrant flowers and leaves have a sweet apple flavor.
• Dried flowers are great in potpourri and make a flavorful and relaxing tea.
• Ideal for a fragrant herb lawn which can tolerate foot traffic. I plant this and it just BLOOMS!! Just walking by my chamomile plants make me smile – they are so fragrant!
• Maintenance: trim every 6 weeks.ack every other month.
Perennial – sun, water weekly during dry spells, feed in spring.
Hardiness zones 3-9

Chamomile growing in the ground


Chives
• Easy to grow from seed. Plant in an area where you want to enjoy their purple flowers, even in a flower bed. They will re-seed themselves if you leave a few of the faded blooms.
• Chives may grow up to a foot tall and have long tubular leaves.
• Clip them as needed to use wherever you might want a very mild onion flavor.
• These are another very simple herb to grow – I just allow them to regrow year after year with little maintenance (divide every 3-5 years).
Perennial – full to partial sun, water weekly during dry spells, feed in spring.
Hardiness zones 3-9

Cilantro
• If you like Mexican food, this is a must-have. You can sow seeds directly in the garden as this one does not transplant very well. Plant at the beginning of the spring and again in summer to ensure your cilantro supply will remain as long as possible. There is nothing better than salsa made with fresh tomatoes and garden grown cilantro.
• Cilantro is known as coriander in some areas, although technically, coriander is the seeds of the plant.
• I have grown this simply for the seeds! A few plants produce a ton, I dried them in paper bags in the garage, and when I was done shook the seeds off.
Annual – full sun, water 2-3 times per week, feed using all purpose plant food. Maintenance: mulch to keep down weeds.
Hardiness zones 3 to 8 when planted in spring
Hardiness zones to 11 when planted in fall or winter

fennel growing in the ground


Fennel
• Aromatic, feathery foliage is an attractive filler in the herb or flower garden.
• Leaves, seeds, and the stem are all edible. Hubby likes fennel so I grow several plants every year.
• Keep surrounding area weed-free.
Short lived Perennial normally grown as an Annual – sun, well-drained soil, fertilize sparingly.
Hardiness zones 2-10

Mint
• Mints are the easiest of any herb to grow. In fact, if you do not contain it in a pot, mints WILL overtake your garden.
• If you have a friend that grows mints, ask them for some cuttings or a rooted plant. Root cuttings in water. My best advice for this one is to keep it in a plastic pot (bury the pot underground) to keep it contained, and when it starts to get too big, cut it bag ruthlessly, and throw away the clippings. You can also grow mints in a large container on a patio.
Perennial will come back every year.
This is my most popular mint post: Why you NEED Lemon Balm in Your Garden.

parsley growing in the ground


Parsley
• Easy to grow, but start from plants at your local garden supply store. If you sow from seeds, start indoors early.
• Whether you like the flat leaf or curled leaf varieties, both will look great in your garden or a pot.
• Cut whenever you need it, but do not take more than a third of the plant at once.
• Freezes well for winter use.
• Also an excellent indoor plan. I’ve kept a pot of parsley on my sunniest windowsill in winter and it did great.
Biennial – full sun, water daily, feed using all purpose plant food. Maintenance includes weeding and pinching back for a fuller appearance.
Hardiness zones 3-9
Here are some simple instructions on How to Harvest and Grow Parsley.

Rosemary
• If you live where there isn’t an extended hard frost, you should be able to grow this one in your landscape. Rosemary varieties range from low creeping groundcovers to shrubs and can be trained into small trees and topiaries. All of them smell great.
• If you are not lucky enough to live where this can be part of your year-round garden, move your plant indoors. As long as rosemary gets watered on a regular basis, it will survive with low light.
• I like to use rosemary stalks as skewers for cooking chicken on the grill.
Perennial – full sun, will live for many years if wintered properly.
Hardiness zones 8 to 10

Sage
• Sage is another herb that can over-winter in almost every climate.
• Grows about two feet tall, and comes in many varieties. The sage varieties with variegated leaves are less hardy.
• Sage likes full sun with well-drained soil.
• Sage makes your Thanksgiving turkey and stuffing taste out of this world.
Perennial – full sun, start from plants or cuttings.
Hardiness zones 5-9

Thyme
• This one makes a great groundcover. Use thyme between rocks or brick to fill in space with a fragrant green carpet. It also makes a great addition to a raised bed where it can trail over the edge.
• Thyme comes in many varieties and colors. I grow English thyme and it comes back year after year with literally no maintenance on my part (it is off by itself among some bushes, and I forget about a lot… simple to care for!)
• Keep surrounding area weed-free.
Perennial – sun, water weekly during dry spells, feed regularly.
Hardiness zones 4-9

This is just a short list of some of the easiest to grow herbs. Most herbs are almost weed-like plants in their native areas, do not fuss over them too much. As your confidence grows, you can add to your collection, and have one of the most enviable herb gardens around.

Please remember that none of this is meant as medical advice. I am not a doctor and do not play one on the internet. Please consult a physician if you have any questions about using herbs so your doctor can better explain to you the benefits, possible side effects, and any warnings about herbs.

More articles on Herbs:

US Heartiness Zones Map

Herbs 101 – a great overview of herbs, uses, and book recommendations.

Herb Planting and Care

Tips for Growing an Herb garden Year-round – indoor herb garden advice.

10 Herbs Your Need to Grow – herb advice, culinary and medical uses for listed herbs.


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Summer Gardening

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


Summer Gardening

So after the slow spring gardening start, it was not until mid-July that any of my veggies started to produce. We have had more than our fair share of rain in 2017, and the temps have been seasonal to above normal. With all the rain I had some garden-fails. Actually a lot of fails this year.

Our green bean crop which is usually fabulous yielded whopping 50 green beans this year. We are still eating green beans I froze in 2016, but the 2017 harvest is long gone. I do not think it was the entire area, however, as I have purchased fresh green beans at garden stands for a very reasonable price.

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


Our Roma tomatoes had a round of blossom rot. I was kinda surprised because I had a hefty dose of lime in there when I mixed up my potting mix (Miracle Grow) + fertilizer + lime mixture. I added more lime (it is almost like a layer of paste), as well as some ground up eggshells and knocked the blossom “tails” off each tomato and they seem to have recovered. But, I lost a good 15-20 tomatoes before that.

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


The Roma tomatoes in the ground are late ripening, but so much larger and untouched by the blossom rot as opposed to the Roma tomatoes in the city picker boxes.

Still, I will have plenty to freezing tomatoes later – which was the whole purpose for those four plants!

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


After the rabbits had eaten all the green pepper plants (they never had a chance to root or blossom!) in the ground, I was left with green pepper plants in the city picker boxes. We have a few green peppers, but nothing thrilling. I bought some enormous ones at a farmer stand this past weekend, and I guess that is what I will have to continue to do for fresh green peppers this year.

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


The banana peppers are in an earth box and doing ok. I grew them for Hubby’s Stuffed Banana Pepper Soup Recipe. I have enough for 4-5 batches, so I guess they were successful.

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


I planted my basil near my blackberry bushes this year. I was not sure how that would turn out since that soil is acidic (I had holly bushes there for years!). The basil is smaller than normal and took a while to get going, but it tastes great and yields enough for our purposes.

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


After last year’s cucumber invasion, I only planted three (or four, I do not recall exactly) cucumber plants this year. And I still got a load!! We have been eating cucumber caprese salad two to three times a week, but I am pretty sure it is time to either freeze those cukes, or start making cucumber salad by the gallon. Already people are turning down my “generous” offer of cucumbers, so doorbell ditching is my only other opetion.

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


Under our patio, I have a container of hens and chicks. I plan on planting them in the ground soon, so they have a chance for next year. Two of them shot off these lovely flowers that lasted for over a month!

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


This is the backyard chamomile – I think it is three or four years old now. I had this bright idea to get a few more plants and try the chamomile up front (because it smells so good!).

Summer Gardening. Summer gardening update of planted vegetables and flowers, hoping for a wonderful and productive garden harvest.


So, I planted five little (2″) plants. Two died right away. And the other three have had to be cut back several times!! I could provide tea for the entire neighborhood!! Those plants have really taken off.

So my losses? The blackberry bushes are not back to where they should be. I keep asking hubby to take them up to the hunting land – maybe they’d flourish there? Or the deer would have a sweet treat.

My patio tomatoes (different than my Roma) gave off about 30 tomatoes and then stopped producing.

The beans were a bust this year. The ground green peppers were also a bust.

Those are my wins and losses in my garden so far this year!

How is your garden growing this summer?!


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Simple Steps to Keep Your Vegetable Garden Producing!

Simple Steps to Keep Your Vegetable Garden Producing! Make the most of your growing season with these simple tips! Easy, yet effective steps you can take to keep your home vegetable garden happy, and producing, all season long.


Simple Steps to Keep Your Vegetable Garden Producing!

Make the most of your growing season with these simple tips! Easy, yet effective steps you can take to keep your home vegetable garden happy, and producing, all season long.

In the early stages of spring, it seems that we spend a lot of time and energy planning and planting our gardens. We are all hyped-up for the spring growing season and thrilled to be out in the garden. As the year progresses though, we sometimes run out of steam – either through lack of production, turning our energies toward different endeavors, or, we just lack time to dedicate to our garden (life happens!). So, how do we keep our vegetables at optimum production as the growing season moves forward?

Whether you have a traditional garden plot, patio planters or boxes, or raised beds, there are some basic practices that keep your garden looking sharp as well as providing your vegetables with their best chance at peak production.

Simple Steps to Keep Your Vegetable Garden Producing! Make the most of your growing season with these simple tips! Easy, yet effective steps you can take to keep your home vegetable garden happy, and producing, all season long.


• Beginning with your soil mix, before you sow seeds or sets your transplants, consider what your soil looks like. For vegetables, it should have about one-third compost mixed in to provide nutrients all season long. If your soil is particularly sandy or heavy clay, you can even mix in a greater quantity of compost. Well-rotted manure can be incorporated, up to about ten percent of your soil. This mix will allow you to spend minimal time on fertilizing your garden during the summer. I use a potting soil mix (Miracle Grow brand), some lime, and plant food in my earth boxes.

• For more on soil, you may want to read about these 10 Common Household Items to Use as Garden Fertilizers!

Simple Steps to Keep Your Vegetable Garden Producing! Make the most of your growing season with these simple tips! Easy, yet effective steps you can take to keep your home vegetable garden happy, and producing, all season long.


• You will also want to discourage any competition for nutrients or sunlight. The main competitor is weeds. Unless you would like to spend all summer pulling weeds out, try to weed early, and often. This way they do not go to seed and perpetuate the cycle. Here are some great tips for weeding your garden.

• Keep a watch out for garden pests. These come in many forms – buggy pests and rodents. These 5 pest repelling plants can help!

Simple Steps to Keep Your Vegetable Garden Producing! Make the most of your growing season with these simple tips! Easy, yet effective steps you can take to keep your home vegetable garden happy, and producing, all season long.


• Tomato Hornworms can clean a plant of leaves in just a day or two. By looking for signs of an infestation, and reacting quickly, you can keep your vegetables in peak production all season long. If you find just one or two pests, you can probably manually pick them off the plants, but larger infestations will require serious treatment. There are many beneficial insects that can be released before an infestation to control pests, too.

• Rodents may be a little more difficult to control (the bunnies got my peppers this year). If you are using raised beds, you can put a lining of chicken wire down before adding your soil mix to help keep burrowing pests out. My brother (and exterminator) uses chicken wire to enclose this garden. He uses a few bricks to hold it in place instead of digging down into the ground. He says it works great (and they have a HUGE garden!)

Simple Steps to Keep Your Vegetable Garden Producing! Make the most of your growing season with these simple tips! Easy, yet effective steps you can take to keep your home vegetable garden happy, and producing, all season long.


• During the summer when your plants are at their peak, keep the ripe produce picked. Plants grow to produce seeds and flowers. If you have more produce than you can handle (amd are not in a position to freeze or can), pick off some of the blooms. It should not hurt future production but will eliminate some of the harvest in the meantime. For leafy plants and annual herbs like basil, keep the flower heads nipped off, and your plants will continue to produce leaves.

• Also, in the heat of summer, water is very important to vegetable growth. If your garden is not getting enough water naturally from rain, you will need to supplement it with a hose. Lack of water can not only kill plants but will cause vegetables to split or shrivel. If your plants are wilting, water them. You may enjoy these practical tips to save water in your garden.

• As your garden starts to wane in late summer, remember to replant those sections where the harvest has been completed. If you planted short-season crops, plan to fill in their space with something else after they have been harvested. Here are some vegetables that are perfect to plant in late summer for a second harvest!

• As the weather turns cooler, you can also use some bed covers to keep your plants producing. This can be a plastic tent over the plants, cold frames over your raised beds, or even moving some of your plants into a greenhouse for the winter. If the weather has turned too cool for tomato plants to set fruit, pick the green ones that are still on the vines, and let them ripen indoors.

You can keep your vegetable garden producing all season long by starting with a good soil mix, a little planning, and routine garden care.


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