Gardening

I love to garden and want to share my gardening tips, gardening advice, and garden know-how with you! Gardening topics include easy gardening ideas for beginners, gardening ideas for longtime gardeners, how to grow plants, how to grow flowers, how to grow herbs, vegetable gardening, how to fix gardening problems, advice on gardening tools and gardening supplies, and more!

8 Pretty Succulent Plants to Grow Indoors

8 Pretty Succulent Plants to Grow Indoors. Growing succulents indoors is easy! Succulents are a wonderful plant to grow in your home. In addition to being tolerant of a variety of temperatures and lighting situations, succulent houseplants are simple to grow. Whether you are searching for a statement plant for your kitchen or a few smaller, ornamental succulent varieties to add to your home's décor, consider planting a few of these pretty succulent plants in your home for year-round enjoyment.


Growing succulents indoors is easy! Succulents are wonderful plants to grow in your home. In addition to being tolerant of a variety of temperatures and lighting situations, succulent houseplants are simple to grow. Since these plants have a natural ability to store their own water within their leaves, stems, and roots, most succulents can withstand a little bit of neglect, making them a great option for indoor growing. Whether you are searching for a statement plant for your kitchen or a few smaller, ornamental succulent varieties to add to your home’s décor, consider planting a few of these pretty succulent plants in your home for year-round enjoyment.


How to Plant Succulents Indoors

Planting succulents for indoor use isn’t much different than potting other plants. Be sure your pots have drainage holes in the bottom and use a pot tray or bowl underneath to avoid a wet countertop or table when you water. It’s also important to choose a well-drained potting soil that is designed especially for succulent plants. If you don’t have access to succulent potting mix, amend a traditional potting soil with extra pumice, sand, or perlite to help the soil drain well.
To transplant your succulents into new pots, gently loosen the soil surrounding the roots and place the plant into the new pot. Succulent roots are brittle and shallow, so use care when transferring your succulent to a new pot. As you place the plant in the pot, gently sift the new soil around the roots of the succulent with your finger. Finish by covering the surface of the soil with sand or gravel and allow the soil to dry for a few days before watering.

How to Care for Your Succulents Indoors

While some varieties of succulents may require special care, the majority of the plants on this list are very low maintenance. Succulents love the dry humidity and warm conditions of most homes, making them a wonderful houseplant. Most indoor succulents need bright light, so placing your plants at or near a window that receives sunlight throughout the day is a good idea. You should also water your plants just enough to keep the leaves from drying out. Once a year, your succulent may need a light feeding with fertilizer, as well as a deep soaking to flush out the soil.

8 Pretty Succulent Plants to Grow Indoors

1. Star Window Plant

Also known as Haworthias, the Star Window Plant is a hardy succulent variety that can withstand an array of neglect and even some damage. In addition to being a very low-maintenance succulent, the Star Window Plant is also an eye-catching houseplant. The pretty lime-colored leaves sprout in a wedge shape and have a beautiful iridescent quality. Each of the succulent’s leaves look like a lovely piece of stained glass inside your pot.

8 Pretty Succulent Plants to Grow Indoors


2. Aloe Vera

This amazing succulent will provide an interesting decorative element to any room and creates a healing sap that has been used for centuries to treat burns and wounds. The large pointed leaves of the aloe vera plant will really make a statement, but watch out for the pointed thorns along their edges. Those sharp thorns can cut someone if they get too close, which means its best to keep your aloe plant out of well-trafficked areas of your home.

3. Burro’s Tail

The beautiful draping leaves in pretty gray-green or gray blue shades are what make Burro’s Tail a beloved succulent for growing indoors. This beautiful plant is at its best when grown in a hanging basket to allow the long stems to shine. The stems of Burro’s Tail can grow up to three feet long, making it a true statement plant in any room.

This lovely succulent is native to Mexico and prefers medium to high light. While Burro’s Tail rarely blooms, you may be a lucky succulent owner who gets to see its lovely pink or red flowers that can appear at the end of the stems during the summer months. This succulent is also surprisingly delicate – the leaves of Burro’s Tail can fall off with the lightest touch. That makes it important to keep this houseplant out of the reach of children and pets to ensure your plant’s long stems remain full throughout its lifespan.

8 Pretty Succulent Plants to Grow Indoors


4. Panda Plant

This interesting succulent is typically grown in homes because of its interesting leaves. The Panda Plant features thick green leaves covered with unique silver hairs, which give the plant a fuzzy, bluish appearance. To add even more visual appeal, the light green leaves are tipped with a rusty brown tint. This small succulent is also simple to grow. Just supply it with adequate water (but not too much!) and prune any wayward leaves and stems to help it keep its shape.

5. Ponytail Palm

While the Ponytail Palm has “palm” in its name, it’s actually not a palm tree at all – and to be quite honest, does not look like a succulent either! The Ponytail Palm succulent’s long green leaves set atop a leathery trunk just make it look more like a palm than a succulent. While this succulent grows slowly, it can reach up to 20 feet when grown indoors, so make sure you have plenty of space for your Ponytail Palm to grow. Native to the United States and Mexico, the Ponytail Palm is the perfect plant for a forgetful gardener because it needs very little watering. Simply plant this succulent in high light or direct sunlight and watch it thrive.

6. Jade Plant

This classic succulent houseplant my grandmother always grew Jade Plants!) is a perennial favorite for good reason – it is one of the easiest succulents on this list to grow. Simply avoid overwatering your Jade Plant and it will last many years to come. It’s also a good idea to plant your Jade Plant in a terra cotta pot to allow for proper air flow through the soil and help balance the plant, which is often top-heavy.

You will love its strong, thick stem and glossy green leaves that show just a tint of red. To keep your Jade Plant looking beautiful throughout its life, you will need to prune its branches on occasion. In addition to keeping the succulent symmetrical, pruning will also help keep your plant from becoming too heavy on one side and toppling over.

hens and chicks succlent plants


7. Hens and Chicks

There two popular succulent plants varieties known as Hens and Chicks – Sempervivum tectorum and Echeveria elegans. These plants are closely related but look very different. Both these plants produce what are known as “chicks” – small identical plants that are slightly offset from the hen, or mother plant. Both varieties also feature rosette-like leaves, but each has their own flowering patterns. Sempervivum grows star-shaped flowers in a pretty pink shade, and the plants that show blooms will quickly die after flowering. Echeveria, on the other hand, grows bell-shaped blooms each year.

8. Crown of Thorns

With its long oval leaves, spiky branches and clusters of tiny flowers, Crown of Thorns is definitely an eye-catching succulent. And this pretty succulent from Madagascar will show its beautiful pink and yellow blooms year-round if it sees enough light. But while direct sunlight will produce the best blooms, this adaptable plant can also make do with medium light (though you may not see blooms on your plant.) The care instructions of this succulent also vary based on whether the plant is blooming or not. A Crown of Thorns with blooms needs slightly more water than one without flowers.

Are you interested in more plants? You’ll want to read these posts:

75 Acid Loving Plants – If you have acidic soil, you need plants that flourish within an acid soil environment. Flowers, vegetables, shrubs, and trees all have specific soil needs; these 75 acid loving plants are great choices for your gardening and landscaping needs.

75 Alkaline Friendly Plants – If you have alkaline soil, you need plants that flourish within an alkaline soil environment. Flowers, vegetables, shrubs, and trees all have specific soil needs; these 75 Alkaline Friendly Plants are great choices for your gardening and landscaping needs.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants – If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair – you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.


Disclosure the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• For more Gardening posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• Enjoy this post? Sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life FREE Weekly Newsletter to stay connected.



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life

Container Garden Harvest

Container Garden Harvest. This is a post to recap my 2018 container gardening harvest including; what worked, what did not work, and what I will be trying again.


This is a post to recap my 2018 container gardening harvest including; what worked, what did not work, and what I will be trying again.

Container Garden Harvest

I haven’t written much about my garden this summer. Life has been very hectic this year and fraught with a lot of problems this summer in the Ann’s Entitled Life household, so garden reports took a backseat to health issues (Max’s, my MIL’s, and my fathers – thank you to my newsletter subscribers who have offered advice and commiserate. It has been very appreciated.)

I did want one final post just to update my garden. I kept a lot of the produce tags in a booklet and made copious notes so I know what worked, and what did not, for next year. I switched to all container gardening this year, turning the old gardening patch into more lawn.

Container Garden Harvest. This is a post to recap my 2018 container gardening harvest including; what worked, what did not work, and what I will be trying again.


Container Garden Harvest. This is a post to recap my 2018 container gardening harvest including; what worked, what did not work, and what I will be trying again.


What worked:

Peppers. OMG, the peppers! I have peppers coming out of my ears. Every week for two months now I have harvested peppers. Red peppers, green peppers, orange bell peppers, banana peppers, and one rogue Carolina Reaper (totally unintentional). Apparently, removing the peppers from bunny-temptation reach was good for peppers. Who knew!?

This summer was very hot by Western New York summer standards, as well as very dry (good thing I live on top of two lakes), and the peppers thoroughly enjoyed the weather.

We used some of the peppers in soups (Hubby’s Stuffed Banana Pepper Soup recipe is extraordinary), and I froze the excess for soups and chilis this winter.

Container Garden Harvest. This is a post to recap my 2018 container gardening harvest including; what worked, what did not work, and what I will be trying again.


Container Garden Harvest. This is a post to recap my 2018 container gardening harvest including; what worked, what did not work, and what I will be trying again.


Cabbage! This was a very pleasant surprise. I packed in too many small cabbages in large containers, but still harvested four of the five planted. And the big ones? Simply beautiful. We ended up making frizzled cabbage as we both love it.

I learned a lot about growing cabbage this year – do not crowd it, water lightly, and it grows great in containers.

Lettuce. Even with the heat, the lettuce was abundant. I was sending bags and bags home with people in June. I wanted to plant for a fall growth (was thinking arugula too), but odds are good we will be out to see my MIL for a month, so I did not bother.

Container Garden Harvest. This is a post to recap my 2018 container gardening harvest including; what worked, what did not work, and what I will be trying again.


Peas. We loved them. I would have been happy if 20x what we harvested had been produced. I plan on planting them again next year, probably more though.

Container Garden Harvest. This is a post to recap my 2018 container gardening harvest including; what worked, what did not work, and what I will be trying again.


What was meh –

Cucumbers. My cucumbers are normally my best growers. This year, they hated the earth boxes (it is fresh soil, nutrients, etc), and ended early. I had purchased too many and planted the in random overflow pots and those did ok, but not great. I have no idea what was up, but I always plant cucumbers since we love them, and will continue to do so.

I did manage to harvest enough cucumbers to make one batch of freezer pickles, and cucumber caprese salad twice a week, but nowhere near the hundreds the earth box normally yields.

Tomatoes. Meh was the best way to describe it. After blossom rot hit I fed and fed and fed to combat that blossom rot and ended up with hundreds of small-ish Roma. (shocker!)

The cherry tomato plant I thought was a waste and was tossing in July ended up producing a TON of tomatoes. So many that I ended up giving them away. As I stated above I was already at cucumber Caprese salad twice a week, there were only so many cherry tomatoes we could eat.

So why were these in the “meh” column? The Romas really were a disappointment.

Spinach. It was so hot, that one day it was beautiful baby spinach delicate and flavorful, the next day it was tough, raggedy old spinach. It was simple to grow; it was just too hot for it this year.

Green beans. Normally a top producer for me, I did get enough for us to eat in season and freeze for later, but not enough to last us the entire winter. That “lasting all winter” is my normal earth box production for my green beans, so I am chalking this one up to the heat. Also next year? I plan on exploring runner green beans for a second harvest later in the season (when things cool down a bit).

Container Garden Harvest. This is a post to recap my 2018 container gardening harvest including; what worked, what did not work, and what I will be trying again.


Other things I grew that I will be trying again:

Herbs. My herb garden tower (post) was AWESOME!! It kept everything contained – especially the mint… which apparently flew about the yard and seeded in my flower planter that was 10 feet away. That mint… Of course, the heat caused a lot of bolting, but I was well pleased with my herb tower.

Brussels Sprouts. These grew surprisingly well in the pots! I learned one per pot, even in the massive pots. I’ll be giving them a go next year.

Spring container gardening post to see where I began the season!

So that is my 2018 recap. It has been cut short and I am currently closing up my gardening for the season after harvesting as much as possible! I’ve spent a lot of time freezing for later.

How did your garden grow this year!?


Disclosure the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• For more Gardening posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• Enjoy this post? Sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life FREE Weekly Newsletter to stay connected.



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life

10 Tips for Growing Coleus

10 Tips for Growing Coleus. Sunny or shady, you want your garden to be full of vibrant colors, and coleus plants deliver that impact! Coleus is one of those plants that can thrive in many conditions, so being familiar with how to grow coleus is smart. Read here for my 10 Tips for Growing Coleus, and see how easy it can be to enjoy this vibrant plant.


10 Tips for Growing Coleus

Sunny or shady, you want your garden to be full of vibrant colors, and coleus plants deliver that impact! Coleus is one of those plants that can thrive in many conditions, so being familiar with how to grow coleus is smart. Read below for my 10 Tips for Growing Coleus, and see how easy it can be to enjoy this vibrant plant.

Choose Your Coleus Variety Wisely

You will find that coleus comes in dozens of varieties, all different colors and even shapes. You can find it in red, green, white, pink, maroon, and more. Shapes include rounded leaves, spiky varieties, and even vines that trail. Mix and match varieties for a real pop of color and texture! Some coleus plants require more sun than others. Make sure you are choosing the correct coleus plant for the “job” (a gardening container filler, a flower bed, etc), and the sun conditions.

Use Nutrient Rich Soil to Grow Coleus

Mix a little organic matter into your soil before planting so it is nutrient rich. Your coleus will last well into the fall months if you give it soil that feeds it instead of limiting it. Basic potting soil mixed with some organic matter like eggshells or compost is ideal.

Be Wise About Coleus Planting Depths

Coleus has shallow roots, so you can get away with smaller pots, but you still want to make sure those roots have room to grow and latch – in other words, do not overcrowd your coleus plants when planting in the ground. You should plant coleus about 3 inches deep, which is typically the length of the root mass plus one inch.

10 Tips for Growing Coleus. Sunny or shady, you want your garden to be full of vibrant colors, and coleus plants deliver that impact! Coleus is one of those plants that can thrive in many conditions, so being familiar with how to grow coleus is smart. Read here for my 10 Tips for Growing Coleus, and see how easy it can be to enjoy this vibrant plant.


Skip the Seeds

Yes, you can grow coleus from seeds, but you will enjoy coleus sooner and longer if you plant from seedlings. They are inexpensive to buy, about $10 per 30+ plant flat, making each seedling just a few cents per piece. They can be found at just about any home and gardening center.

Sunny or Shady Side

Coleus will do well even if they only see a few hours of sun per day. Basic coleus varieties will do better if they get a good 4-5 hours of sun per day. Sun allows for more vibrant colors, but coleus is thought of as a shady plant, so try not to expose it to all day, harsh sunlight.

A Good Watering Helps

Try to give your coleus about 2 inches of water per week, allowing the soil to dry out in between waterings. They don’t like soggy soil and may rot if you allow them to sit in water. Instead, push for 2-3 waterings a week of ½ an inch to an inch of water each.

Coleus are Low Maintenance

Except for the early going most coleus are virtually maintenance free. When young, pinch-back the growing tips of a young coleus plant encourages branching and a bushy plant.

10 Tips for Growing Coleus. Sunny or shady, you want your garden to be full of vibrant colors, and coleus plants deliver that impact! Coleus is one of those plants that can thrive in many conditions, so being familiar with how to grow coleus is smart. Read here for my 10 Tips for Growing Coleus, and see how easy it can be to enjoy this vibrant plant.


No Deer

Look for deer-resistant coleus at your local garden center. While not being as attractive to deer, the leaves will attract butterflies!! It can grow in garden beds and houseplant containers.

Keep an Eye on the Cold

Even though coleus is durable, it cannot withstand the cold. If your area is experiencing a frost or low night time temps, cover your plants or bring them in. When the fall months hit, your plants will die unless you bring them indoors.

Remember that Coleus is an Annual

While coleus is an annual, if you grow them in pots and bring them into your nice warm home over the winter – caring for them correctly (some bright light and weekly watering) – they should be healthy enough to give you another season!

The Coleus is the perfect plant for people who are beginning gardening, or who have a less than green thumb. In other words, you do not have to be an experienced gardener to grow coleus – although many experienced gardeners DO grow coleus! It is easy to grow, and requires little maintenance. Whether your grow them in the ground or in containers, they provide a beautiful spot of color to enhance your gardening plants and flowers.

10 Tips for Growing Coleus. Sunny or shady, you want your garden to be full of vibrant colors, and coleus plants deliver that impact! Coleus is one of those plants that can thrive in many conditions, so being familiar with how to grow coleus is smart. Read here for my 10 Tips for Growing Coleus, and see how easy it can be to enjoy this vibrant plant.


Are you interested in more plants? You’ll want to read these posts:

75 Acid Loving Plants – If you have acidic soil, you need plants that flourish within an acid soil environment. Flowers, vegetables, shrubs, and trees all have specific soil needs; these 75 acid loving plants are great choices for your gardening and landscaping needs.

75 Alkaline Friendly Plants – If you have alkaline soil, you need plants that flourish within an alkaline soil environment. Flowers, vegetables, shrubs, and trees all have specific soil needs; these 75 Alkaline Friendly Plants are great choices for your gardening and landscaping needs.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants – If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair – you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.


Disclosure the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• For more Gardening posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• Enjoy this post? Sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life FREE Weekly Newsletter to stay connected.



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life
Return to top of page