Gardening

I love to garden and want to share my gardening tips, gardening advice, and garden know-how with you! Gardening topics include easy gardening ideas for beginners, gardening ideas for longtime gardeners, how to grow plants, how to grow flowers, how to grow herbs, vegetable gardening, how to fix gardening problems, advice on gardening tools and gardening supplies, and more!

10 Fruits and Vegetables to Grow for Canning

10 Fruits and Vegetables to Grow for Canning. When planning your garden you may be looking for the best foods to grow for canning. Canning fruits and vegetables is a great way to save money and provide your family with wholesome foods year round. When choosing what you will grow in your canning garden you need to look for the items your family goes through the most.


When planning your garden you may be looking for the best foods to grow for canning. Canning fruits and vegetables is a great way to save money and provide your family with wholesome foods year round. When choosing what you will grow in your canning garden you need to look for the items your family goes through the most.

10 Fruits and Vegetables to Grow for Canning

Jams and jellies are always popular, canned pasta sauce and freshly canned salsa are always perfect to have on hand. If you are intentionally laying out a fruit and vegetable garden to have a surplus for canning, the plants listed would be my top choices (I chose four fruits, and six

vegetables).

If you have other vegetables and fruits not listed below and you would like a canning recipe, you might enjoy my 101 Canning Recipes for Fruits and Vegetables from Your Garden While 101 canning recipes can be overwhelming, the truth is that list has something for everyone on it!

10 Fruits and Vegetables to Grow for Canning. When planning your garden you may be looking for the best foods to grow for canning. Canning fruits and vegetables is a great way to save money and provide your family with wholesome foods year round. When choosing what you will grow in your canning garden you need to look for the items your family goes through the most.


Blackberries

Blackberries are great to grow (I highly recommend thornless blackberry bushes!) and make wonderful jam and pie filling options for canning. Click here to learn how to grow blackberries!

10 Fruits and Vegetables to Grow for Canning. When planning your garden you may be looking for the best foods to grow for canning. Canning fruits and vegetables is a great way to save money and provide your family with wholesome foods year round. When choosing what you will grow in your canning garden you need to look for the items your family goes through the most.


Blueberries

Blueberries are great for growing as ornamental shrubs that just so happen to give you a great jam and pie filling option for canning. IF you are looking to replace common shrubs in your landscaping with something edible blueberries are a great option. If you would like to learn how to make blueberry pie filling, simply click here.
Blueberries are acid loving plants. Blueberries require soil that drains well, in full sun most of the day. Fertilize and feed!

10 Fruits and Vegetables to Grow for Canning. When planning your garden you may be looking for the best foods to grow for canning. Canning fruits and vegetables is a great way to save money and provide your family with wholesome foods year round. When choosing what you will grow in your canning garden you need to look for the items your family goes through the most.


Cherries

A cherry is a stone fruit. Freshly picked cherries are truly delicious (my grandparents had a cherry tree in their backyard), and we have apple and pear trees on Hubby’s hunting land (organic, and I gotta say they can contain extra, er “protein” when harvesting – ick) and while we normally think to eat cherries fresh (YUM!), jams, jellies, and moonshine cherries are all well known canned cherry recipes.
To learn more on how to take care of fruit trees, click here.

10 Fruits and Vegetables to Grow for Canning. When planning your garden you may be looking for the best foods to grow for canning. Canning fruits and vegetables is a great way to save money and provide your family with wholesome foods year round. When choosing what you will grow in your canning garden you need to look for the items your family goes through the most.


Strawberries

Strawberries make great jam or jelly. Strawberries can be grown in pots or used as a groundcover in well-mulched garden beds coming back nnd spreading year after year. Click here to learn how to grow your very own strawberry patch!

10 Fruits and Vegetables to Grow for Canning. When planning your garden you may be looking for the best foods to grow for canning. Canning fruits and vegetables is a great way to save money and provide your family with wholesome foods year round. When choosing what you will grow in your canning garden you need to look for the items your family goes through the most.


Carrots

Carrots are easy to grow and do well in raised beds and deep pots (you need a minimum of 12″ of depth). Check your package for growing time (if you are sowing seeds) – usually 3 months. If you purchased seedlings, the time lessens. Loose soil (get it at least 12″ deep) and sow seeds at least 2″ apart. Fertilize.
Canning carrots is a great way to preserve them to flavor soups and stews all year round.

Click here to learn how to can carrots.

10 Fruits and Vegetables to Grow for Canning. When planning your garden you may be looking for the best foods to grow for canning. Canning fruits and vegetables is a great way to save money and provide your family with wholesome foods year round. When choosing what you will grow in your canning garden you need to look for the items your family goes through the most.


Cucumbers

I am the cucumber growing queen. It is a good thing we like them! Cucumbers are essential to any canning garden. They are simple to grow using a standard soil mixture, regular watering and fertilizing. I grow mine in my earth boxes and they produce like mad!

10 Fruits and Vegetables to Grow for Canning. When planning your garden you may be looking for the best foods to grow for canning. Canning fruits and vegetables is a great way to save money and provide your family with wholesome foods year round. When choosing what you will grow in your canning garden you need to look for the items your family goes through the most.


Garlic

Plant cloves in a sunny location with well-drained soil in the fall. Plant cloves root side down approximately 6″ apart in rows approximately 2′ apart. If you are in a colder climate, your garlic will require mulch for the winter. Up north garlic grows quite well. We have a local “garlic guy” that sells 20+ varieties. Garlic is considered a very easy to grow crop, so you may want to give it a try!

If you would like a Canned Garlic Recipe simply click here.

10 Fruits and Vegetables to Grow for Canning. When planning your garden you may be looking for the best foods to grow for canning. Canning fruits and vegetables is a great way to save money and provide your family with wholesome foods year round. When choosing what you will grow in your canning garden you need to look for the items your family goes through the most.


Green Beans

I love green beans! Green beans are a great vegetable to serve with family meals and really easy for beginning canners. Adding fresh herbs, peppers, or onions to your home canned green beans is a great way to make mealtime easy. If you take the time to grow and can your own beans for soups and chili you can do the same to save time later.

10 Fruits and Vegetables to Grow for Canning. When planning your garden you may be looking for the best foods to grow for canning. Canning fruits and vegetables is a great way to save money and provide your family with wholesome foods year round. When choosing what you will grow in your canning garden you need to look for the items your family goes through the most.


Peppers

Peppers are essential to making homemade salsa and are a great flavor addition to home canned green beans, peas, corn, and carrots. We grow a large variety of pepper plants each year. Depending on your needs, consider some hot peppers, banana peppers, as well as yellow, red, and green peppers (for sale variety!), Pay close attention to the Scoville scale on the peppers you choose!
Hubby’s Homemade Hot Sauce Recipe is a good one for those delicious garden peppers!

10 Fruits and Vegetables to Grow for Canning. When planning your garden you may be looking for the best foods to grow for canning. Canning fruits and vegetables is a great way to save money and provide your family with wholesome foods year round. When choosing what you will grow in your canning garden you need to look for the items your family goes through the most.


Potatoes

Potatoes are the number one vegetable crop in the world. While they originated in South America, potatoes are now available throughout the year in our grocery stores as they are harvested somewhere every month of the year. If you would like to learn how to plant and harvest potaoes, simply click here.

Do you have a favorite fruit or vegetable that you grow specifically to can later?


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10 Best Low Light Houseplants

assortment of low light houseplants in a collage


Many people seem to think that if they don’t have all day sunlight streaming into their home, they cannot successfully grow houseplants. But the truth is, there are tons of houseplant varieties that do not require (or want) a lot of direct sunlight to thrive.

If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair – you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.

Look below for some of my recommendations of the best indoor plants for low light, and see what great options are available when it comes to growing houseplants.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants

peace lily


Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum)
These Peace Lily are not a true lily, but they are very beautiful evergreen perennials which makes them good houseplants. Very easy to care for, the Peace Lily cleans the air in the room they are in!
Keep soil moist, fertilize every 2-4 months.

rainbow moss plant hanging basket


Rainbow Moss (Selaginella Uncinata)
Rainbow Moss (or peacock fern – but it is not a fern at all!) requires a well-drained soil and does like humidity. A great indoor plant if you do try it outdoors this really is sun-sky… it grows well in the shade (to zone 6).
Keep moist but do not over water to prevent root-rot.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants. If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair - you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.


Pothos (Epipremnum aureum – also known as devil’s ivy)
Even if you have never cared for a houseplant, pathos is an easy enough houseplant for you to grow. This makes an excellent starter plant and is ideal for low light situations. It does well in hanging planters and will trail downward nicely if it is well cared for. You can also place it on a plant stand and it provides a beautiful drape as it grows.
Drought tolerant, water when dry.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants. If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair - you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.


Ivy (a genus of 12–15 species of climbing evergreen)
Ivy is a classic houseplant that comes in many varieties! It is perfect to place in hanging pots as it will trail down to the floor nicely. It comes in various shades of green and white and is easy to keep alive with minimal care. You can even transplant ivy from outdoors to grow indoors!

Ferns
Soft and frilly ferns are easy to grow and come in a variety of colors and sizes. You can find ferns in colors of green, blue, silver, and white, and they may change color throughout the year. They can grow to be quite full and bushy, making them a fun accent piece.

bamboo in planter


Bamboo (evergreen perennial flowering plants- subfamily Bambusoideae – grass family Poaceae)
Not only is ornamental bamboo plant easy to grow, it is said to be lucky! It takes minimal water and light, making it a simple plant to grow and enjoy. It offers clean lines and a modern look, making it perfect for desk and home décor as well.
Water sparingly.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants. If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair - you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.


Philodendron (200 different types)
The philodendron is an easy to find houseplant that that is as low maintenance as they come. The shades of yellow and green it offers makes it gorgeous to look at, plus some studies suggest that this plant can actually help keep your air clean! So add a few to your space, and enjoy the benefits it provides.
Allow the top of the soil to dry out (about an inch or so) before watering again.

fittonia albivenis in pot


Ruby Red (Nerve Plant – fittonia albivenis)
This is a very easy houseplant to grow. A great low-light houseplant, it does ok in medium light too (if you have direct sunlight on it, diffuse the sunlight with a curtain). This is a small houseplant so will not overgrow a space.
Water when soil feels dry, fertilize every 3 months.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants. If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair - you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.


Emmeliana Selaginella
This is a little more temperamental than most houseplants. The emmeliana selaginella likes an acidic soil, humidity, and water (do not flood, keep moist). This looks lovely in a hanging basket, but it does need to be kept out of the sun or else it will burn.
Watering: keep soil moist.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants. If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair - you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.


Berry Allusion Arrowhead (syngonium podophyllum)
This plant can grow! A ground pot (3 gallon ultimately, although you can start smaller and trabsplant) is probably the best choice to grow this plant. It flowers year-round. It makes for a nice corner plant in an office or near a couch.
Water when dry, fertilize every 3 months.

Are you ready to start enjoying houseplants even without a ton of natural sunlight? Then consider these 10 low light houseplants perfect for low light, and get growing no matter what your light conditions are! You can find most of these plants at your local home and garden center, a local florist, or even via online specialty stores.

Sources:

University of Florida
Central Florida Ferns
Encyclopedia Britannica
Garden.org


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10 Easy to Grow Herbs

assortment of herbs in a collage


If you are a beginner gardener and would like to start growing herbs, this list of easy to grow herbs will help you decide what to cultivate.

If you like to cook even a little bit, at some point you start thinking about growing your own fresh herbs. The cooks on TV always use them and rave about the difference in flavor over those jars of dried ones. It is much easier than you thought to grow your own herbs! Here is a collection of some of the easiest to grow in your garden.

10 Easy to Grow Herbs

First a word about growing herbs – for the most part, they do not require much care. If you grow them in a sunny spot, water when dry, and harvest no more than one-third of the plant at any one time, your herbs should reward you with abundance.

basil growing in the ground


Basil
• This is very easy to grow. If you like pesto, grow this one! Start from seeds several times during the spring/summer season to keep your supply coming in as long as possible.
• Keep flower heads pinched off to promote leaf growth, and remove top buds to make plants bushier (do not allow the plant to bolt).
Annual – you will need to replant every year.
Hardiness zones 1-10
Here are some simple instructions on How to Harvest and Grow Basil.

Chamomile growing in the ground


Chamomile, Roman
• Deliciously fragrant flowers and leaves have a sweet apple flavor.
• Dried flowers are great in potpourri and make a flavorful and relaxing tea.
• Ideal for a fragrant herb lawn which can tolerate foot traffic. I plant this and it just BLOOMS!! Just walking by my chamomile plants make me smile – they are so fragrant!
• Maintenance: trim every 6 weeks.ack every other month.
Perennial – sun, water weekly during dry spells, feed in spring.
Hardiness zones 3-9

Chamomile growing in the ground


Chives
• Easy to grow from seed. Plant in an area where you want to enjoy their purple flowers, even in a flower bed. They will re-seed themselves if you leave a few of the faded blooms.
• Chives may grow up to a foot tall and have long tubular leaves.
• Clip them as needed to use wherever you might want a very mild onion flavor.
• These are another very simple herb to grow – I just allow them to regrow year after year with little maintenance (divide every 3-5 years).
Perennial – full to partial sun, water weekly during dry spells, feed in spring.
Hardiness zones 3-9

Cilantro
• If you like Mexican food, this is a must-have. You can sow seeds directly in the garden as this one does not transplant very well. Plant at the beginning of the spring and again in summer to ensure your cilantro supply will remain as long as possible. There is nothing better than salsa made with fresh tomatoes and garden grown cilantro.
• Cilantro is known as coriander in some areas, although technically, coriander is the seeds of the plant.
• I have grown this simply for the seeds! A few plants produce a ton, I dried them in paper bags in the garage, and when I was done shook the seeds off.
Annual – full sun, water 2-3 times per week, feed using all purpose plant food. Maintenance: mulch to keep down weeds.
Hardiness zones 3 to 8 when planted in spring
Hardiness zones to 11 when planted in fall or winter

fennel growing in the ground


Fennel
• Aromatic, feathery foliage is an attractive filler in the herb or flower garden.
• Leaves, seeds, and the stem are all edible. Hubby likes fennel so I grow several plants every year.
• Keep surrounding area weed-free.
Short lived Perennial normally grown as an Annual – sun, well-drained soil, fertilize sparingly.
Hardiness zones 2-10

Mint
• Mints are the easiest of any herb to grow. In fact, if you do not contain it in a pot, mints WILL overtake your garden.
• If you have a friend that grows mints, ask them for some cuttings or a rooted plant. Root cuttings in water. My best advice for this one is to keep it in a plastic pot (bury the pot underground) to keep it contained, and when it starts to get too big, cut it bag ruthlessly, and throw away the clippings. You can also grow mints in a large container on a patio.
Perennial will come back every year.
This is my most popular mint post: Why you NEED Lemon Balm in Your Garden.

parsley growing in the ground


Parsley
• Easy to grow, but start from plants at your local garden supply store. If you sow from seeds, start indoors early.
• Whether you like the flat leaf or curled leaf varieties, both will look great in your garden or a pot.
• Cut whenever you need it, but do not take more than a third of the plant at once.
• Freezes well for winter use.
• Also an excellent indoor plan. I’ve kept a pot of parsley on my sunniest windowsill in winter and it did great.
Biennial – full sun, water daily, feed using all purpose plant food. Maintenance includes weeding and pinching back for a fuller appearance.
Hardiness zones 3-9
Here are some simple instructions on How to Harvest and Grow Parsley.

Rosemary
• If you live where there isn’t an extended hard frost, you should be able to grow this one in your landscape. Rosemary varieties range from low creeping groundcovers to shrubs and can be trained into small trees and topiaries. All of them smell great.
• If you are not lucky enough to live where this can be part of your year-round garden, move your plant indoors. As long as rosemary gets watered on a regular basis, it will survive with low light.
• I like to use rosemary stalks as skewers for cooking chicken on the grill.
Perennial – full sun, will live for many years if wintered properly.
Hardiness zones 8 to 10

Sage
• Sage is another herb that can over-winter in almost every climate.
• Grows about two feet tall, and comes in many varieties. The sage varieties with variegated leaves are less hardy.
• Sage likes full sun with well-drained soil.
• Sage makes your Thanksgiving turkey and stuffing taste out of this world.
Perennial – full sun, start from plants or cuttings.
Hardiness zones 5-9

Thyme
• This one makes a great groundcover. Use thyme between rocks or brick to fill in space with a fragrant green carpet. It also makes a great addition to a raised bed where it can trail over the edge.
• Thyme comes in many varieties and colors. I grow English thyme and it comes back year after year with literally no maintenance on my part (it is off by itself among some bushes, and I forget about a lot… simple to care for!)
• Keep surrounding area weed-free.
Perennial – sun, water weekly during dry spells, feed regularly.
Hardiness zones 4-9

This is just a short list of some of the easiest to grow herbs. Most herbs are almost weed-like plants in their native areas, do not fuss over them too much. As your confidence grows, you can add to your collection, and have one of the most enviable herb gardens around.

Please remember that none of this is meant as medical advice. I am not a doctor and do not play one on the internet. Please consult a physician if you have any questions about using herbs so your doctor can better explain to you the benefits, possible side effects, and any warnings about herbs.

More articles on Herbs:

US Heartiness Zones Map

Herbs 101 – a great overview of herbs, uses, and book recommendations.

Herb Planting and Care

Tips for Growing an Herb garden Year-round – indoor herb garden advice.

10 Herbs Your Need to Grow – herb advice, culinary and medical uses for listed herbs.


Disclosure the links in this post may be affiliate links.

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