Gardening

I love to garden and want to share my gardening tips, gardening advice, and garden know-how with you! Gardening topics include easy gardening ideas for beginners, gardening ideas for longtime gardeners, how to grow plants, how to grow flowers, how to grow herbs, vegetable gardening, how to fix gardening problems, advice on gardening tools and gardening supplies, and more!

10 Tips for Growing Coleus

10 Tips for Growing Coleus. Sunny or shady, you want your garden to be full of vibrant colors, and coleus plants deliver that impact! Coleus is one of those plants that can thrive in many conditions, so being familiar with how to grow coleus is smart. Read here for my 10 Tips for Growing Coleus, and see how easy it can be to enjoy this vibrant plant.


10 Tips for Growing Coleus

Sunny or shady, you want your garden to be full of vibrant colors, and coleus plants deliver that impact! Coleus is one of those plants that can thrive in many conditions, so being familiar with how to grow coleus is smart. Read below for my 10 Tips for Growing Coleus, and see how easy it can be to enjoy this vibrant plant.

Choose Your Coleus Variety Wisely

You will find that coleus comes in dozens of varieties, all different colors and even shapes. You can find it in red, green, white, pink, maroon, and more. Shapes include rounded leaves, spiky varieties, and even vines that trail. Mix and match varieties for a real pop of color and texture! Some coleus plants require more sun than others. Make sure you are choosing the correct coleus plant for the “job” (a gardening container filler, a flower bed, etc), and the sun conditions.

Use Nutrient Rich Soil to Grow Coleus

Mix a little organic matter into your soil before planting so it is nutrient rich. Your coleus will last well into the fall months if you give it soil that feeds it instead of limiting it. Basic potting soil mixed with some organic matter like eggshells or compost is ideal.

Be Wise About Coleus Planting Depths

Coleus has shallow roots, so you can get away with smaller pots, but you still want to make sure those roots have room to grow and latch – in other words, do not overcrowd your coleus plants when planting in the ground. You should plant coleus about 3 inches deep, which is typically the length of the root mass plus one inch.

10 Tips for Growing Coleus. Sunny or shady, you want your garden to be full of vibrant colors, and coleus plants deliver that impact! Coleus is one of those plants that can thrive in many conditions, so being familiar with how to grow coleus is smart. Read here for my 10 Tips for Growing Coleus, and see how easy it can be to enjoy this vibrant plant.


Skip the Seeds

Yes, you can grow coleus from seeds, but you will enjoy coleus sooner and longer if you plant from seedlings. They are inexpensive to buy, about $10 per 30+ plant flat, making each seedling just a few cents per piece. They can be found at just about any home and gardening center.

Sunny or Shady Side

Coleus will do well even if they only see a few hours of sun per day. Basic coleus varieties will do better if they get a good 4-5 hours of sun per day. Sun allows for more vibrant colors, but coleus is thought of as a shady plant, so try not to expose it to all day, harsh sunlight.

A Good Watering Helps

Try to give your coleus about 2 inches of water per week, allowing the soil to dry out in between waterings. They don’t like soggy soil and may rot if you allow them to sit in water. Instead, push for 2-3 waterings a week of ½ an inch to an inch of water each.

Coleus are Low Maintenance

Except for the early going most coleus are virtually maintenance free. When young, pinch-back the growing tips of a young coleus plant encourages branching and a bushy plant.

10 Tips for Growing Coleus. Sunny or shady, you want your garden to be full of vibrant colors, and coleus plants deliver that impact! Coleus is one of those plants that can thrive in many conditions, so being familiar with how to grow coleus is smart. Read here for my 10 Tips for Growing Coleus, and see how easy it can be to enjoy this vibrant plant.


No Deer

Look for deer-resistant coleus at your local garden center. While not being as attractive to deer, the leaves will attract butterflies!! It can grow in garden beds and houseplant containers.

Keep an Eye on the Cold

Even though coleus is durable, it cannot withstand the cold. If your area is experiencing a frost or low night time temps, cover your plants or bring them in. When the fall months hit, your plants will die unless you bring them indoors.

Remember that Coleus is an Annual

While coleus is an annual, if you grow them in pots and bring them into your nice warm home over the winter – caring for them correctly (some bright light and weekly watering) – they should be healthy enough to give you another season!

The Coleus is the perfect plant for people who are beginning gardening, or who have a less than green thumb. In other words, you do not have to be an experienced gardener to grow coleus – although many experienced gardeners DO grow coleus! It is easy to grow, and requires little maintenance. Whether your grow them in the ground or in containers, they provide a beautiful spot of color to enhance your gardening plants and flowers.

10 Tips for Growing Coleus. Sunny or shady, you want your garden to be full of vibrant colors, and coleus plants deliver that impact! Coleus is one of those plants that can thrive in many conditions, so being familiar with how to grow coleus is smart. Read here for my 10 Tips for Growing Coleus, and see how easy it can be to enjoy this vibrant plant.


Are you interested in more plants? You’ll want to read these posts:

75 Acid Loving Plants – If you have acidic soil, you need plants that flourish within an acid soil environment. Flowers, vegetables, shrubs, and trees all have specific soil needs; these 75 acid loving plants are great choices for your gardening and landscaping needs.

75 Alkaline Friendly Plants – If you have alkaline soil, you need plants that flourish within an alkaline soil environment. Flowers, vegetables, shrubs, and trees all have specific soil needs; these 75 Alkaline Friendly Plants are great choices for your gardening and landscaping needs.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants – If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair – you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.


Disclosure the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• For more Gardening posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• Enjoy this post? Sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life FREE Weekly Newsletter to stay connected.



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub

Do you like to make homemade soap and homemade scrubs? If you use your hands for gardening or other outdoor activities that leave them very dirty, this DIY gardener hand soap scrub is perfect for you! It is simple to make, soothing and mild, yet the Epsom salt and baking soda do a marvelous job of cleaning the dirt on your hands, including in lines and around your finger beds.

If you are like me and constantly “forgetting” to use yard work or gardening gloves, give this wonderful DIY gardener hand soap scrub formula a try. I bet you’ll be glad you did!

Note:

• For the mild soap, give Dr. Bronner’s a try. This is a peppermint soap. Peppermint is thought to have antiseptic and antimicrobial properties. It can also help keep your skin cool and lower skin irritation.

• The coconut oil will leave your hands feeling soft and smooth.

Lavender Essential Oil is thought to calm the skin, reduce skin irritations and may help with acne and eczema.

Geranium Essential Oil – is noted for its astringent properties and may reduce the appearance of wrinkles.

Myrrh Essential Oil is thought to have anti-microbial and astringent properties.

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


Gardener Hand Soap Scrub Materials:

• 2 TBSP Coconut Oil
• ¼ cup Mild Soap
• 1 tsp Honey
• 2-3 drops Argan Oil
• 10 drops Lavender Essential Oil
• 10 drops Geranium Essential Oil
• 10 drops Myrrh Essential Oil
• ½ cup Epsom Salts
• ½ cup Baking Soda

Gardener Hand Soap Scrub Mise en Place:

Measuring Spoons
Measuring Cup
• Bowl (microwave safe)
• Medium Sized Bowl
• Spatula

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


Gardener Hand Soap Scrub Instructions:

• Melt coconut oil in the microwave for 20 seconds. Add melted coconut oil to a medium size bowl.

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


• Add mild soap, honey and Argan oil to the melted coconut oil.

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


• Add Lavender Essential Oil.

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


• Add Geranium Essential Oil.

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


• Add Myrrh Essential Oil.

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


• Add Epsom salts and baking soda.

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


• Mix ingredients together.

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


• Add to airtight container.

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


To use Gardener Hand Soap Scrub:

• Apply to wet hands.

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


• Rub hands together to allow the soap scrub to get into the crevices and get out the dirt.

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


• Rinse hands thoroughly.
• Dry.

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


• Store the gardener hand soap scrub in an airtight container.

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


• If giving as a gift, add a ribbon and label the contents. Well, you may want to label the contents regardless of whether or not you are keeping this or gifting to someone.

• To print the instructions for How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub, just click here.

Note: None of this is meant as medical advice. I am not a doctor, and do not play one on the internet. Please consult a physician if you have any questions about using essential oils so your doctor can better explain to you the benefits, possible side effects, and any warnings about essential oils.

How to Make a Gardener Hand Soap Scrub. This wonderfully scented, very effective, homemade gardener hand soap scrub is very easy to make. If you have rough, dry, dirty hands from gardening and yard work, mix up a batch of this diy soap/hand scrub and let your hands feel good again. This makes a great gift for gardeners too!


If you enjoy the outdoors, you may be interested in these DIY recipes:

Homemade Bug Repellent Bars – With warm weather comes bugs! Mosquitoes, flies, and other bothersome insects can intrude when you are trying to enjoy a summer picnic, a backyard barbecue, or a day by the pool. While you can always use a commercial insecticide soap, spray or lotion, sometimes you do not want that on your skin. A great attribute of many essential oils is their ability to ward off unwanted insects.

Best Essential Oil Mosquito and Bug Repellent Recipes – One of the best attributes of quite a few essential oils is their ability to ward off unwanted insects. Check out these easy pesticide recipes to keep the little buggers at bay.


Disclosure: the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• For more DIY Beauty posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• For more Gardening posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• If you enjoyed this post, be sure to sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life weekly newsletter, and never miss another article!



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life

Spring Container Vegetable Gardening

Spring Container Vegetable Gardening. Have a vegetable garden? Have you tried growing vegetables in pots? This year I went to all container vegetable gardening. This how I set-up my spring container vegetable garden in containers.


This year I switched over to all container gardening. I had dabbled in container gardening every since I purchased my earth boxes, but this year I had the herb island removed and sod laid down where it used to be.

Spring Container Vegetable Gardening

I had the thornless blackberry bushes removed, and dirt laid where they had grown for the last 7 years. I had them bucketed, and a friend took them to his land where he planted them near his raspberry brambles.

I decided to go to containers because the truth is I ain’t gettin’ any younger. I was tired of bending over, getting on my knees to weed, fighting slugs, etc.

This post has been a long time in coming. I planted the day after Mother’s day (perfect for my area). May was a simply glorious month after a (very) cool April. I took photos of when I started, a week later, a week after that… and ended up with so many photos I became overwhelmed. And in truth, my container gardens have become overwhelming too!! My backyard patio looks like a jungle. People cannot believe how my plants in the containers have taken off.

Container Garden Vegetables Planted:

• Green Beans (earth boxes and regular garden pots)
• Cucumbers (earth box and regular garden pots)
• Peppers (earth boxes)
• Roman Tomatoes (the city picker boxes)
• Cherry Tomatoes (regular garden container)
• Cabbage (regular garden containers)
• Brussels Sprouts (regular garden containers)
• Peas (regular containers, three different types)
• Lettuce (bags)
• Spinach (bags)
• Mustard Greens (bags)
• Herbs – 2 different basil, thyme, spearmint, and something else…

So, here’s a few photos of how things are coming along this week.

Spring Container Gardening. Experimenting with container gardening. Lettuce, spinach, mustard greens grown the same way.


This is a blend of lettuce. It is soft, soft, soft, and tastes great! Hubby and I have pulled off a few leaves to taste, but I have not yet cut to harvest.

Spring Container Gardening. Experimenting with container gardening. Cabbage in a single pot.


I am growing several different types of cabbage. It is interesting as two were planted as singles in smaller containers, and six, three per container were planted in very large containers (I “thought” one or two would die off per container… thought wrong). I plan on keeping a notebook with all the tags and notes on what went right, and what went wrong, in my move over to container gardening.

Spring Container Gardening. Experimenting with container gardening. Roma tomatoes in city pickers.


There are far, far, FAR too many tomatoes in these city pickers. Again, I expected some to die off. I am considering transplanting into the ground before it is too late, but the whole experiment was to see how many would grow successfully in a planter. I know the Romas grow well in these containers as they did last year, so even though it makes me twitchy, I am prepared to ride it out and see what happens.

Spring Container Gardening. Experimenting with container gardening. Various types of peas, each different type in a single pot.


My peas are climbing. This is a new vegetable for me to plant. I have not done it at this house, and we’ve owned it for 13 years now. I am excited to see how well they will produce.

Spring Container Gardening. Experimenting with container gardening. Banana Peppers growing in an earth box.


I am growing: banana peppers (shown above), red peppers, green peppers, and orange peppers. I planted 17 pepper plants (various types), lost 2, and am “down” to 15 plants. The banana peppers are already producing.

A real perk to this container gardening is the bunnies are not eating all my plants. Last year, the peppers didn’t survive to flower as the rabbits came through and simply ate the leaves before the plants could grow. This year? We have at least four rabbits hopping through the backyard every day, and {knock on wood} so far they have left hungry.

Spring Container Gardening. Experimenting with container gardening. Cabbage in a single pot.


These are my Brussels Sprouts. The pots are enormous. I planted six Brussels Sprouts plants altogether, 3 per pot. In this pot, one has already died off. In the other pot, all three plants have been attacked by bugs. I think this weekend I’ll be transplanting one of these two plants into the other container, remove those three bug-eaten plants, and stake these so they can grow.

Spring Container Gardening. Experimenting with container gardening. Garden tower of herbs.


When I decided to transition to (what was supposed to be exclusively) container gardening this year, I knew I’d need a few containers. I had all my earth boxes, the city pickers, and large containers I had saved from prior years that had held flowers. I purchased a few cool aqua and purple containers to add a pop of color. And, I purchased this garden tower.

Hubby and I started looking at for a garden tower two years ago. I simply didn’t want to pay the price (they were going for $500!!!) So this year when I found this garden tower (post) at gardener’s supply for under $200, I snatched it up.

IT. IS. AMAZING!!

I am so, so, soooooooooooooooo happy I bought this. I decided to grow all my herbs in it this year (well, except for some oregano that has been in the ground for the last five years). We chose not to install the irrigation system, and I water (nearly) every day. I plan on buying at least one more next year for flowers, possibly two more (I may try peppers in there). For the small footprint, it really packs a visual whallop (not to mention it grows herbs pretty darned well!)

Spring Container Gardening. Experimenting with container gardening. Green beans growing in an earth box.


I have green beans growing everywhere – earth boxes (above), single pots, in the ground (because I overbought and didn’t want to waste them) – in all I have 18 green bean plants growing and starting to flower. I have no idea what I was thinking. All I can say is if these all produce… I am glad we like green beans.

Spring Container Gardening. Experimenting with container gardening. Flowers.


Spring Container Gardening. Experimenting with container gardening. Flowers.


Spring Container Gardening. Experimenting with container gardening. Flowers.


I even managed a few flowers!

All-in-all this year’s container gardening is off to a good start.

If you are wondering how I planted the planters:

The earth boxes followed these directions: earth box set-up I have not really deviated from those instructions since I started using them in 2014.

The pots and city pickers were as follows:

• A scoop of drainage rocks not covering any drainage holes.
• A half full layer of Miracle Grow Potting Soil.
• A layer (yes, a layer) of Garden-tone vegetable food.
• Water (I use a sprinking water can for this).
• Fill the remainder of the pot with Miracle Grow Potting Soil.

Everything is an experiment this year outside the earth boxes. It should be interesting to see how much, or how little, the pots produce compared to the in-ground planting I have done for years.

Are you gardening this year? Containers, in-ground, or a mix of the two? How is your garden growing?


Disclosure the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• For more Gardening posts on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.

• Enjoy this post? Sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life FREE Weekly Newsletter to stay connected.



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life
Return to top of page