Horsehair Brooms

Horsehair Brooms


In my quest to buy new household goods for our Florida condo, I have been researching a lot of products I never gave a thought about before. Hubby and I have decided we are going to take some time, go through the basement, the (stuffed) front closet, and more importantly, the giant kitchen-utensil drawer (that will be some post!) before we head down south. While I have been buying things I know we don’t have extras of such as dishes, vacuums and lighting, other things – like pots and pans we have extras of and can bring down south and don’t need to be newly purchased.

Some of the items I look at are mundane. I forget why I bought that everyday item – it was cheap or I needed it now – but research on the everyday items wasn’t something I always was faithful to, or had access to in the age before the internet.

I mentioned that we have all tile floors in our Florida condo. I plan on putting down area rugs – we are on the third floor and I don’t want us to sound like a heard of thundering elephants to the people below us – yeah there is sound barrier, but still, better well padded than an annoying neighbor. We bought a vacuum cleaner (a woot deal Hubby found) and now I am on the hunt for a great broom. I think we are more likely to sweep the tile floors between house cleaner service than we are to vacuum them. I also plan on buying a swiffer (Max barks at the swiffer whenever I use it – loads of family fun!).

In my investigations, I have found that natural horsehair brooms are the gold standard for brooms.

Horsehair from manes and tails is more durable than most natural fibers.

When looking for a horsehair broom, you need to research the length and amount of hair broom as well as the mixture of horse mane and tail hair in a broom. The mane hair is softer and in the long is run less sturdy than the tail hair. The more horsehair, the more dirt is picked up in one sweep. A split horsehair broom has split tips at the end and is good for sweeping up a lot of dust or fine sand. Soft horsehair bristles naturally attract and retain dust.

Note: I have no idea when/how the horsehair for brooms is collected.

I have not made the purchase yet. I am not sure I will. While horsehair brooms may be the best material out, I want to do a bit of investigating on how the material is gathered, and I am looking for input from all of you…

Do you own a horsehair broom? How do you like it?


Helpful links:

Broom Knowledge
Horsehair Brooms
Redecker
German Horsehair Brooms
Italian Horsehair Broom



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Comments

  1. I do not have have one and have not heard of them before. Interesting information Ann, thank you.
    BTW what kind of vacuum did your hubby buy?

  2. Ok Ann, you got me….I’ve never put that much thought into my broom. But then again, I’m mostly a dust mop girl since I have all hardwoods except kitchen and bathroom tile, where? yes, yes I do use an (obviously old-run-of-the-mill) broom!! That is when I don’t just continue the swoop of the dust mop because I’m too lazy to change tools. But I must admit….I’m curious???? May have to check these horsehair brooms out!!
    I so enjoy your posts, Ann! I love my daily dose of Annsentitledlife! It’s always good for a smile, a laugh and learning something new, too! Keep them coming!

  3. I really enjoy your posts but I swear you are my DH’s BFF! He fell in love with all the renovation photo’s and insists you must have a degree in journalism.

    • Awwww tell your Hubby thanks, Barb! I have an eclectic degree, but the only journalism classes I ever took were for public speaking – which I LOVED! (Yeah, I’m a weirdo)

      Ann

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