10 Best Low Light Houseplants

assortment of low light houseplants in a collage


Many people seem to think that if they don’t have all day sunlight streaming into their home, they cannot successfully grow houseplants. But the truth is, there are tons of houseplant varieties that do not require (or want) a lot of direct sunlight to thrive.

If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair – you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.

Look below for some of my recommendations of the best indoor plants for low light, and see what great options are available when it comes to growing houseplants.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants

peace lily


Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum)
These Peace Lily are not a true lily, but they are very beautiful evergreen perennials which makes them good houseplants. Very easy to care for, the Peace Lily cleans the air in the room they are in!
Keep soil moist, fertilize every 2-4 months.

rainbow moss plant hanging basket


Rainbow Moss (Selaginella Uncinata)
Rainbow Moss (or peacock fern – but it is not a fern at all!) requires a well-drained soil and does like humidity. A great indoor plant if you do try it outdoors this really is sun-sky… it grows well in the shade (to zone 6).
Keep moist but do not over water to prevent root-rot.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants. If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair - you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.


Pothos (Epipremnum aureum – also known as devil’s ivy)
Even if you have never cared for a houseplant, pathos is an easy enough houseplant for you to grow. This makes an excellent starter plant and is ideal for low light situations. It does well in hanging planters and will trail downward nicely if it is well cared for. You can also place it on a plant stand and it provides a beautiful drape as it grows.
Drought tolerant, water when dry.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants. If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair - you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.


Ivy (a genus of 12–15 species of climbing evergreen)
Ivy is a classic houseplant that comes in many varieties! It is perfect to place in hanging pots as it will trail down to the floor nicely. It comes in various shades of green and white and is easy to keep alive with minimal care. You can even transplant ivy from outdoors to grow indoors!

Ferns
Soft and frilly ferns are easy to grow and come in a variety of colors and sizes. You can find ferns in colors of green, blue, silver, and white, and they may change color throughout the year. They can grow to be quite full and bushy, making them a fun accent piece.

bamboo in planter


Bamboo (evergreen perennial flowering plants- subfamily Bambusoideae – grass family Poaceae)
Not only is ornamental bamboo plant easy to grow, it is said to be lucky! It takes minimal water and light, making it a simple plant to grow and enjoy. It offers clean lines and a modern look, making it perfect for desk and home décor as well.
Water sparingly.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants. If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair - you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.


Philodendron (200 different types)
The philodendron is an easy to find houseplant that that is as low maintenance as they come. The shades of yellow and green it offers makes it gorgeous to look at, plus some studies suggest that this plant can actually help keep your air clean! So add a few to your space, and enjoy the benefits it provides.
Allow the top of the soil to dry out (about an inch or so) before watering again.

fittonia albivenis in pot


Ruby Red (Nerve Plant – fittonia albivenis)
This is a very easy houseplant to grow. A great low-light houseplant, it does ok in medium light too (if you have direct sunlight on it, diffuse the sunlight with a curtain). This is a small houseplant so will not overgrow a space.
Water when soil feels dry, fertilize every 3 months.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants. If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair - you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.


Emmeliana Selaginella
This is a little more temperamental than most houseplants. The emmeliana selaginella likes an acidic soil, humidity, and water (do not flood, keep moist). This looks lovely in a hanging basket, but it does need to be kept out of the sun or else it will burn.
Watering: keep soil moist.

10 Best Low Light Houseplants. If you have a darker room without a lot of natural sunlight, do not despair - you can still grow houseplants indoors! Here is a list of the 10 Best Low Light Houseplants to grow inside. You may be surprised to find so many great options when it comes to growing indoor plants in low light conditions.


Berry Allusion Arrowhead (syngonium podophyllum)
This plant can grow! A ground pot (3 gallon ultimately, although you can start smaller and trabsplant) is probably the best choice to grow this plant. It flowers year-round. It makes for a nice corner plant in an office or near a couch.
Water when dry, fertilize every 3 months.

Are you ready to start enjoying houseplants even without a ton of natural sunlight? Then consider these 10 low light houseplants perfect for low light, and get growing no matter what your light conditions are! You can find most of these plants at your local home and garden center, a local florist, or even via online specialty stores.

Sources:

University of Florida
Central Florida Ferns
Encyclopedia Britannica
Garden.org


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Jelly Bean Bark Recipe

white chocolate bark with jelly beans on a white board


This is the easiest bark recipe ever! Whether making this jelly bean bark for an Easter basket or with leftover jelly beans, your whole family will love this simple to make jelly bean bark recipe.

Jelly Bean Bark Recipe

If you are looking for more Easter recipes, you may want to try these:

Easy Easter Cupcakes Recipe – Dress up your cupcakes for a sweet little Easter treat, perfect for Easter brunch, dessert or to send one in for a school snack.

Bunny Pancakes Recipe – If you are looking for cute breakfast ideas for your children, this bunny pancakes recipe will make you smile as they fill you up.

If you enjoy bark recipes, you may want to try these:

Eggnog Bark recipe – The delicious combination of pecans, cranberries and spices make for a perfect holiday bark recipe.

White Chocolate Peppermint Bark Recipe – This refreshing peppermint bark is so good you will want to make a double batch.

Jelly Bean Bark Recipe. This is the easiest bark recipe ever! Whether making this jelly bean bark for an Easter basket or with leftover jelly beans, your whole family will love this simple to make jelly bean bark recipe.


Jelly Bean Bark Ingredients:

• 8 oz White Chocolate Chips
• 1 cup Jelly Beans, assorted flavors

Jelly Bean Bark Mise en Place:

• Non-stick Cooking Spray
• 8″x8″ Metal Baking Dish
• Spatula
• Cooking Pot
• Knife

Jelly Bean Bark Recipe. This is the easiest bark recipe ever! Whether making this jelly bean bark for an Easter basket or with leftover jelly beans, your whole family will love this simple to make jelly bean bark recipe.


Jelly Bean Bark Directions:

• Spray inside of a small pot, as well as the baking dish, with non-stick cooking spray.
• Place the white chocolate chips into the small pot and place it on the stove on low heat.
• Stir chips until smooth and melted.

Jelly Bean Bark Recipe. This is the easiest bark recipe ever! Whether making this jelly bean bark for an Easter basket or with leftover jelly beans, your whole family will love this simple to make jelly bean bark recipe.


• Once the mixture is smooth, pour it into the prepared baking dish. Use a spatula to smooth out the white chocolate into an even layer.

Jelly Bean Bark Recipe. This is the easiest bark recipe ever! Whether making this jelly bean bark for an Easter basket or with leftover jelly beans, your whole family will love this simple to make jelly bean bark recipe.


• While the chocolate is still warm, drop the jelly beans over the top. Allow the jelly beans sink into the chocolate. You can add as many or as little as you wish.
• After the jelly beans are added, transfer the baking dish to the refrigerator for one hour. This is how long it will take for the chocolate mixture to solidify.

Jelly Bean Bark Recipe. This is the easiest bark recipe ever! Whether making this jelly bean bark for an Easter basket or with leftover jelly beans, your whole family will love this simple to make jelly bean bark recipe.


• Remove the chocolate mixture from the refrigerator and use your knife to gently pry up the edges. The bark should come out as one giant sheet.
• Break the bark into smaller pieces for serving.

You do not need to keep your Jelly Belly bark refrigerated. You can store it in an air tight container or bag until ready to serve.


Jelly Bean Bark Recipe

This is the easiest bark recipe ever! Whether making this jelly bean bark for an Easter basket or with leftover jelly beans, your whole family will love this simple to make jelly bean bark recipe.

Prep Time:10 minutes
Cook Time: 5 Minutes
Total Time: 1 Hour 15 Minutes

Ingredients:

8 oz White Chocolate Chips
1 cup Jelly Beans, assorted flavors

Directions:

• Spray inside of a small pot, as well as the baking dish, with non-stick cooking spray.
• Place the white chocolate chips into the small pot and place it on the stove on low heat.
• Stir chips until smooth and melted.
• Once the mixture is smooth, pour it into the prepared baking dish. Use a spatula to smooth out the white chocolate into an even layer.
• While the chocolate is still warm, drop the jelly beans over the top. Allow the jelly beans sink into the chocolate. You can add as many or as little as you wish.
• After the jelly beans are added, transfer the baking dish to the refrigerator for one hour. This is how long it will take for the chocolate mixture to solidify.
• Remove the chocolate mixture from the refrigerator and use your knife to gently pry up the edges. The bark should come out as one giant sheet.
• Break the bark into smaller pieces for serving.

• Makes 8 servings Jelly Bean Bark

white chocolate bark with jelly beans on a white board



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Chemo Round 2 For Max

Chemo Round 2 For Max. Max's GME Update. This is an update of the chemotherapy protocol of our dog, Max who is battling Granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (GME). This is a canine disease where the white blood cells attack the central nervous system.


This is an update of the chemotherapy protocol of our dog, Max, who is battling Granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (GME). This is a canine disease where the white blood cells attack the central nervous system

Chemo Round 2 For Max

In July of 2014 Max, our (now) nine year old Coton de Tulear was diagnosed with GME. I’ve written about his progress extensively, here and here and here and here and here. This is the original post where I detailed the trail to diagnoses and remission.

Last month, I relayed the sad news that our pooch, Max, had relapsed on his GME. We went to Cornell for the first of four planned chemotherapy treatments to try and push his Granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis back into remission.

So many things have changed for Mr. Max:

His circling decreased and got wider. The small, tight circles of January were not as prevalent – only a few times this past month were they small and tight. Less circling is a good thing!

A few days before he was to have his chemo treatment, we went to our local vet and had his panel done. The blood test showed elevated white blood cells, and a decrease in his liver numbers (a good thing). He was put on denamarin in January after his liver enzymes came back elevated – a result of the huge Prednisone dose he has been taking for the last two months. This happened before, so we again hoped the denamarin would work… and it did.

When we got to Cornell they ran new bloodwork. His white blood cells had returned to normal range, so his neurologist thinks they were elevated was because he was feeling poorly last week.

However, on doing his physical testing she noticed the area around his stomach was showing pain. They did an ultrasound for his gallbladder. His gallbladder is enlarged, but there is no sign of mucus blockage or sediment. Because of this, we did get another medication – ursodiol – to try and make his gallbladder happy (so the plug doesn’t happen and so sediment doesn’t form a stone).

In January we were concerned because Max had lost weight while on a high dose of Prednisone – this month we are concerned because he gained almost TWO pounds!! For a small dog (15#) that is a huge weight gain. Because of this, and the discomfort surrounding his abdomen, Hubby was pushing for a decrease in the Prednisone. He wanted to go from 7.5mg to 5mg. Originally, Dr. Stephan agreed to that, but then she changed her mind and just dropped him to 6.25mg. I asked if it was because she was not convinced he was yet in remission, and she responded in the affirmative.

Chemo Round 2 For Max. Max's GME Update. This is an update of the chemotherapy protocol of our dog, Max who is battling Granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (GME). This is a canine disease where the white blood cells attack the central nervous system.


Hubby and I sat down with Dr. Stephan to talk about Max’s future. The three-year longevity span came and went last July. As I said last month, we were (nicely) reminded that Max is well past that point. So, I asked how many dogs were past the three-year mark: she knew of FIVE (Max is one of them!). It was actually four now as one of those five pooches developed diabetes due to the high Pred, and was put to sleep.

Of the four dogs with GME currently being treated at Cornell that have survived longer than three years, Max is the one with the longest survival. By that I mean he was diagnosed the longest ago and is at the 3 years (nearly) 8-month mark – none of the other dogs are that far over the 3-year mark.

One of the questions I asked was about a necropsy. Like Alzheimer’s in humans, GME can only be 100% completely diagnosed in dogs after death. All the symptoms are there, the MRI says THIS, but the diagnosis confirmation happens after the pet has died. Since this may not happen on a visit to Cornell, I wanted to be certain Max could help future pets with this horrible disease (his local vet can arrange it). He’s clearly a fighter, and obviously, his treatment has been superior for his survival. If other pets (and their owners) can benefit from Max’s diagnosis and treatment, we want that to happen.

While Max may continue to beat all the odds and again enter remission for his GME, we are at the point where we know it is just a matter of time. Every day with him is a gift we will cherish. It is amazing to me how a little 13-pound dog (his natural weight before all this happened) could be so tough. The little guy is a real fighter.


Previous Max posts (read in order from the bottom up to follow his whole story):

Max is Back to Chemo for His GME
Max Had a Relapse
Mr. Max April 2016 Update
Max March 2016 Update
Mr. Max Post Cornell Visit Information
Max’s Latest GME Update
Max’s GME Update, One Year Later
Max’s GME Update, Month 11
Max’s GME Update
An Update on Mr Max, March 2015
Updating Max’s GME
An Update On Mr. Max
Last 2014 Trip To Cornell For Max
Back To Cornell
Max’s First Cornell Follow-up Visit
Max Exercises More Than I Do!
Updating the Mr. Max Situation
A Mr. Max Update
Mr. Max, Mr. Max, Mr. Max
It’s A Mr. Max Post!


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