Florida Condo Renovations

What WON'T You DIY?


Over the course of the next few weeks, I will share some of our Florida Condo renovations and furniture finds/projects in pictures. Unfortunately, we didn’t get anywhere near as much done as we would have liked. Our original list was as follows:

2014 Florida Condo Renovation List

• New sink and counter
• New bathroom vanities, counter tops and faucets
• New bathroom medicine chests
• New windows
• Backsplash
• Refinish kitchen cabinets
• Clean air vents
• Replace interior doors
• Replace closet shelving systems
• Finish painting

What we completed was this:

2014 Florida Condo Renovations Completed

Replaced the kitchen faucet
New windows
• Cleaned air vents
• Replaced interior doors (some were replaced, some painted)
Replace closet shelving systems
Finished painting
Cleaned up old hardware

Hubby and I have decided we will invite his mom down in November for a week (she strongly hinted she would like to see the place), so Hubby ordered doors for the closets that he is going to turn into bypass door systems, which are now stacked in the spare room. Those will be installed before she arrives, and if what Hubby plans to do works, should be a fun post!

The kitchen counter may not be the project we expected. While we replaced the faucet, Hubby may decide to laminate the kitchen counter top. I wasn’t convinced until I saw the work they had done next door to us (they are selling that condo and the counter top work is NICE), and since I really don’t want to deal with granite, I can be persuaded. We need a deeper sink, so next spring this is project #1. The way the counter top is set up now, if we just laminate, we won’t have to replace the back-splash.

The bathroom cabinets are about 29″ high, and standard minimum height is 32″ high. I really like the height we have at home, so want to measure that up before we move forward on the replacement down here next spring. Should be interesting to see what we can find bathroom-cabinetry-wise, or if Hubby will have to build two cabinet bottoms, or hire someone to build them. We may be able to keep the huge mirrors and Hollywood-lights (don’t care that they aren’t “in style”, they are practical), and we’ll just have to figure out something for the little medicine chest.

In some ways I don’t mind that we still have projects left for next year. It will give us some time to figure out exactly what would be best for the bathroom cabinetry, medicine chest, mirror and lights.

Are you don’t any renovation projects this year? Have you started? How is it coming along?


For more Renovation posts from Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life

Florida Replacement Windows

Florida Replacement Windows. Our Florida Replacement Windows experience. Safety concerns, hurricane strength, pictures of the process, and before and after photographs. Step by step hurricane window replacement to Florida Hurricane code, on the Atlantic Ocean in Florida.


Last year Hubby and I bought a condo down in the St. Augustine area of Florida. Our bid reflected a dire need for new windows to be installed. I shared some pictures with you earlier this year. The picture up top is the before back window facing the intra-coastal, and the after front window facing the ocean. Pretty much all the before windows looked like that one (that was the best pic I had), and now we have nice, new, see-through windows like the after photograph (again, the best pic I had).

As soon as we arrived down south this past January, Hubby got the name of several contractors from our HOA president, and the condo managers. Since this is a condo, we had no stylistic choices other than double or single hung windows. And this place is all about an ocean view, so therefore we wanted windows we can clean, so double hung windows were our choice. We also replaced the slider out to the deck. Over the years it must have has issues with salt build-up because it was barely opening enough for Max to pass through!

In St. John’s county, the in wind debris regions (that’s us!) these are the requirements:

Based on the 2010 Florida Building Code, Effective March 15th, 2012. Wind Speeds established in St. Johns County: Category I is 122 mph and includes screen enclosures, temporary, agricultural, and minor storage buildings. Category II is 132 mph and includes all residential, most commercial, and buildings or structures not included in Categories I, III, and IV. Category III and IV structures is 142 mph and includes buildings and structures with a substantial hazard to human life and essential facilities.

We are in the red zone on the ocean.

We were told by the installer that impact windows for Florida installation are now made in Florida. The specs state that these windows pass missile resistance testing!!! I guess that is why the installer said we could take a baseball bat to the windows and not have pieces of glass fly out (not that we are testing the notion).

The actual replacement process of these windows was fairly long. We are on the third floor of our condo, so scaffolding needed to be set up for the installers to reach each one of our windows. The old window was removed, the area cleaned out, and butyl flashing was put around the opening to prevent moisture intrusion, and the window frame was installed, shimmed and adjusted for plumb. Then the bottom window was installed, then the top window. There was quite a bit of manipulation with the springs to get the windows to rise and fall smoothly. Looking through my pictures, I am guessing there were 20 steps in between that I didn’t take note of. Well, the inspector was pleased when he was here to sign off on the work.

In all the installers were here for six day replacing 6 windows, a sliding glass door, and our entry way door.

Here are some pictures of the process:

Florida Replacement Windows


Florida Replacement Windows


One of the side windows. The side windows were fairly difficult for them to get to because of the room pitch for the unit below (we are the last unit on the top, but the floors below us each have at least one more unit). This one was the easier of the two side windows because it was flat enough at a point to secure their scaffolding and ladders. The other side was something else. Let’s just say these men aren’t afraid of heights!

Florida Replacement Windows


That is the scaffolding set up they had for the front and back windows.

Florida Replacement Windows


Florida Replacement Windows


Florida Replacement Windows


Florida Replacement Windows


Florida Replacement Windows


Florida Replacement Windows


These are the highlights of one of the window installs – minus little things like the screws and such.

Florida Replacement Windows


While the installers did install new sills, and repainted, repaired and in some cases, replaced what was on the exterior of the windows, Hubby was responsible for the interior drywall patching and painting. We were fortunate that Hubby could do the repairs, but it is something to consider when deciding which installer to use. Do they do the entire job leaving the site better than when they started, or will you have to do some repairs to the walls and paint?

I am very glad that this is finished. It was number one on our list of Florida Renovation Projects for 2014. Not only do we now have our beautiful view, we shouldn’t have to worry about water infiltration, possible window bursts during a hurricane, and wow, is it quiet in here!! The added bonus of this dense glass is it is pretty sound deadening. We hear none of the road noise, children or dogs outside. It is a great bonus!


• If you enjoyed this post, be sure to sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life weekly newsletter, and never miss another article!

• For more Renovation projects on Ann’s Entitled Life, click here.



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life

How To Easily Remove Dry Paint From Unwanted Places

How To Easily Remove Dry Paint From Unwanted Places. Forgot to remove the hardware during a recent paint job and slobbered a bit of latex paint on the  door knobs? Hinges? Strike plates? Or perhaps the painters before you did and now the paint has been dried on there for 10, 15, even 20 years?  Instead of replacing the hardware so it looks clean, how about cleaning off the old paint instead?


How To Easily Remove Dry Paint From Unwanted Places

Did you forget to remove the hardware during a recent paint job and slobbered a bit of latex paint on the door knobs? Hinges? Strike plates? Or perhaps the painters before you did and now the paint has been dried on there for 10, 15, even 20 years? Instead of replacing the hardware so it looks clean, how about cleaning off the old paint easily and completely in just a few minutes instead?



For years Hubby has extolled the wonders of Goof Off, and I haven’t listened. Every single time there would be a drop of rogue paint left behind by painters, tar tracked on the floors after our hardwood floors were installed, or some glue residue remains left on glass or plastic after we removed a price sticker, Hubby’s answer was always: Goof Off.

Recently we repainted our entire Florida condo, including doors and the inside of closets. Hubby is a perfectionist (obviously the reason he married me), and doesn’t feel that a random dab of paint on hardware of floors enhances the ambiance of a place.

Since he did all the painting since our return (it was kind of useless for both of us to paint a door or try and squeeze into a closet), the task of cleaning the hardware fell to me.

How To Easily Remove Dry Paint From Unwanted Places


Hubby handed me a container of Goof Off and a rag, and let me have at it.

How To Easily Remove Dry Paint From Unwanted Places


Now, at first I was more than a tad skeptical. Sometimes Hubby’s “miracle” products require a lot of elbow grease, some sort of trick or just don’t work as well as he professes.

How To Easily Remove Dry Paint From Unwanted Places


This time though? I gotta say he was right.

If there was only a stray, single layer of paint, the Goof Off dissolved the stray paint on contact. If there was build up (and some of it was up to an 1/8″ thick!), I had to rub a bit harder or apply 2-3 times.

How To Easily Remove Dry Paint From Unwanted Places


The goof off worked wonderfully!

The hardware is original to the building (late 80s-early 90s), and I really liked it and was glad we could keep it. All the hardware for each door took me well under 10 minutes to clean up with the Goof Off – I spent more time hunting down a rag than I did cleaning the dried paint! In all I removed paint from nine inner door knobs and their accompanying hardware, and spent just a little over an hour doing it. (We did buy new hinges though.)

So, Hubby’s trick to easily remove dried on latex paint? Goof Off – it works.


Disclosure: the links in this post may be affiliate links.

• If you enjoyed this post, be sure to sign up for the Ann’s Entitled Life weekly newsletter, and never miss another article!

10 Easy Paint Tips

• For more Ann’s Entitled Life renovation posts, click here.



FOLLOW US ON:
Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life Ann's Entitled Life
Return to top of page